Episode 6:Previously missing

Rejoice, this is an episode missing thought deleted and unrecoverable.

Martyn and Gerrod look at some episodes from series 5 of Doctor Who, this was recorded in 2010.

The podcast can be accessed via different places, including Miro, Stiticher, Blubrry, Player fm and Itunes.

Episode 60: Interview with Matt Smith & co

Martyn travelled to Cardiff’s Cardiff, to bring you audio from the BBC’s first official Doctor Who convention. Includes a press room Q&A with Steven Moffat, Matt Smith, Karen Gillan and Caroline Skinner.

Thanks to the BBC for inviting us to the official convention. Next episode will be a review of the event.

Special thanks to Cameron from Blogtor Who and Phil and Paul from Who’s He?.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to Amazon Music, PodchaserPlayer FM, Stitcher, and Apple Podcasts.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Socials:

Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Pete – @BeeblePete

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Doctor Who Promo Pic

Filming has just started on Series 7 of Doctor Who in Cardiff. This series will see the last days of the Ponds as Karen Gillan and Arthur Darvill return for their final, rollercoaster voyage with The Doctor.

Amy and Rory have been at the Doctor’s side for more than two series but what will he do after their heartbreaking departure? On returning for his third series as the Eleventh Doctor, Matt Smith says: “It’s thrilling and exciting to be back and working with two of my closest friends.” Karen Gillan adds, “It’s just brilliant to be back on the TARDIS with Matt and Arthur for our craziest adventures yet.”

New guest stars so far confirmed include David Bradley, Rupert Graves and Mark Williams. Series 7 will then see a dramatic turn of events when The Doctor meets a new friend.

Prepare yourselves for thrills, adventures and dramatic surprises as the show builds towards its enormous, climactic 50th anniversary year. Fourteen big, blockbuster-movie episodes – each a brand new epic adventure featuring new monsters and some familiar foes as you’ve never seen them before.

Doctor Who is a BBC Cymru Wales Production for BBC ONE.



Book Review-Doctor Who: Magic of the Angels

The Doctor, Amy and Rory round off a sight-seeing tour round London with a trip to the theatre. That’s when things start to go wrong.

The Doctor wonders why so many young girls are going missing from the area. When he sees Sammy Star’s amazing magic act, he thinks he knows the answer. Sammy’s glamorous assistant disappears at the climax of the act – but this is no stage trick.

The Doctor and his friends team up with residents of an old people’s home to discover the truth. And together they find themselves face to face with a deadly Weeping Angel. Whatever you do – don’t blink!

The quick read books are a bit of a double-edged sword, on one hand, they’re only 128 pages so it’s great for a short train journey, on the other, if you get an interesting story it can feel incredibly rushed. As the Doctor Who quick reads go this is quite decent. The weeping angels were used well and the characterisation and dialogue of our dynamic trio feel authentic, which is something that has plagued a few previous Doctor Who books.

Whilst it’s not a groundbreaking book it makes for an enjoyable read.



Book Review- The Brilliant Book 2012

You may think that calling your book ‘brilliant’ would be a foolish boast, or overly optimistic, it leads to a lot of pun related jokes, if it is anything but brilliant. The Brilliant book, however, is brilliant and the boast is anything but foolish.

It’s more or less an encyclopaedia of series 6. You have a plethora of mini-synopsis on each episode, details on deleted scenes, an explanation about the missing pirate, the interview’s with the writers, cast and some of the directors.



This really is an intriguing book, packed with so much content that it’s impossible to read it all in one sitting. You’ll find yourself, going back again and again. There’s a list of every hat every Doctor has worn. There are scripts from deleted scenes, Charles Dickens Twitter feed, George’s school report and a look at the CGI and effects of the show. There are loads of little in-jokes and references; Henry Gordon Jago presents the section on Madame Vastra. My personal favourite piece was the history of the Corsair and the storyboard for the original opening of The Doctor’s Wife.

Doctor Who is a family show and this is a family book. Dad will love it, the kids will love it, and even mum will love it.

The Brilliant Book 2012 is out now.

Eleventh Hour Commentary

Martyn gives up all pretence of retirement. He and Gerrod attempt their first audio commentary, for Doctor Who: The Eleventh Hour. This will probably also be our last.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to Amazon Music, PodchaserPlayer FM, Stitcher, and Apple Podcasts.

Check out our Youtube.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.


Socials:

Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Pete – @BeeblePete

Sam-@Sammichaelcomic

Instagram:

Martyn-@BadWilf



Episode 45: Entertainment Media Show

Martyn and Pete from Bad Wilf and, Chris from the Pharos Project talk to:

  • David Prowse (Star Wars, Hitchhiker’s, Tomorrow People)
  • Eve Myles (Torchwood)
  • Arthur Darvill (11th Doctor companion ‘Rory Williams’)
  • Paul McGann (8th Doctor)

EMS: collectormanialondon.com

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to Amazon Music, PodchaserPlayer FM, Stitcher, and Apple Podcasts.

Check out our Youtube.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Socials:

Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Pete – @BeeblePete

@pharosproject

Instagram:

Martyn-@BadWilf

More pictures – most are courtesy of Tim Drury (Tim’s Flickr)

Dr Who talk
Dr Who talk
Barber, Moffett, Blackwood
Cosplayers
Cyberman
Martyn & Cyberman
Angel & Silcence
Angel & Silence
Future Amy
TARDIS headgear
TARDIS dress
Peg Doll
David Tennant
With Paul McGann
Classic Who talk
Kate O’Mara
Classic Who talk

Review: Doctor Who-The God Complex

After the past three episodes, The God Complex had a lot to live up to and on first viewing, I wasn’t sure if I liked it. The set up just seemed a little strange. But on second viewing I think it’s a strong contender for my favourite episode of Nu-Who. It’s written by Toby Whithouse who wrote the second-series story, School Reunion and the fifth-series story, Vampires in Venice.

The hotel made for a creepy, atmospheric setting. It was even shot like a horror movie, with elements of the shining added. Visually it is spectacular; director Nick Hurran worked wonders with the setting like he did with the last episode, The Girl Who Waited.



Everything in this hotel screamed creepily. The framed photos on the wall added to this; not only did we see pictures of the current residents but also previous, including some past Doctor Who monsters: there was a Sontaran, a Judoon and a Tritovore.

Almost-companion Rita is brilliant but we’ve seen that set up before and knew she wouldn’t make it. It would have been a nice surprise for her to stay on and travel with the Doctor. Retcon please, Mr Moffat. Maybe Rita was a ganger?

The fear inside the rooms was a really intriguing idea; just what did the Doctor see behind door number 11? The Valeyard? Himself?

Also, what did Amy’s door number mean? 7th Nu-Who companion? Or did the door represent the age she was when she first met the Doctor? Or am I just over-thinking it?

It was interesting after last week to see how Rory had completely lost faith in the Doctor and could have effectively saved everyone by walking them through an exit.

Once again, we get echoes of McCoy’s manipulative, calculating Doctor in Smith’s portrayal. The scene in which he convinces Amy to lose faith in him was very reminiscent of the 7th Doctor and Ace in the curse of Fenric. I also felt that the monster was a reflection on the Doctor himself. We even get the Doctor having to make quite possibly the most grown-up decision he has made in the whole of his travels in space and time: he can see what he has done to Rory; he can see what he has done to Amy. The only thing that didn’t sit right with me is why have Amy and Rory stuck with him for so long? They’ve been through worse. Or maybe this wasn’t the reason but the catalyst for the Doctor to see things how they are.

I feel bad for writing this as the man has just swum 140 miles in sewage invested water for charity but I felt David Walliams was the weak link of the episode. It could just be that he is too famous and I couldn’t get past that to truly buy his portrayal as Gibbis. Which is a shame really as I know Walliams is a life-long fan of Doctor Who. He actually had my favourite line of the whole episode: “We’re lining all the streets with trees so invading forces can march in the shade.”

Overall it’s a great episode, sharp script, great acting and great directing and has made this half of the series four-for-four. Let’s just hope next week’s – Closing Time – makes it five-for-five.



Review – Doctor Who: The Girl Who Waited

The Girl Who Waited heralds something we haven’t seen in a while-three episodes in a row that are good. Let’s think about that – the past three episodes have all been good.

First, it’s written by Tom MacRae, who himself is an impressive man. At just 23 he had his own show, Sky One’s Mile High. In the eight years since his career has gone from strength to strength. He is a true talent powerhouse. MacRae has previously written for Doctor Who before: he wrote the Cyberman two-parter for series 2.

This episode is Doctor Who at its best and, if any episode challenges Neil Gaiman’s The Doctor’s Wife to a Hugo award, it’ll be this one. This is an intelligent adventure, one most definitely one for the adults.
It’s timey-wimey and deals with parallel time streams. The Doctor and Rory are stuck in one time stream, Amy in another, which happens to run faster. A few minutes for Rory and The Doctor is a week for Amy.

The episode deals with paradoxes and moral dilemmas caused by paradoxes. The Doctor forces Rory to make a brutal decision. We see even more how Rory’s character has developed. We see him really angry at the Doctor for letting something like this happen. He even challenges the Doctor with the line “You’re turning me, into you.”  Every member of the cast puts in a magnificent performance, but this is Karen Gillan’s episode. Here, we see her really flex her acting muscle and she does it well. She plays the older version of Amy incredibly well. She only adds the most subtle of stiffness to her joints. Never overplaying it, she’s just subtly slower. She even deepens her voice, slightly for the older Amy.

The scene where the older and younger Amy are discussing their love for Rory is truly moving.

We also get insight into the darker side of the Doctor and we’re shown the risks and danger involved in travelling with him. Personally, I think Smith, like McCoy before him, is best, when he plays the cold, calculating, manipulative Doctor. People thought Smith should be worried following Tennant. No, the actor following Smith is the one who should worry.

The dynamic between the TARDIS crew is going to be permanently altered after this episode. Although Amy will never know what her other self went through, Rory has been deeply affected by the future Amy that he met. He met a more cynical, hate-filled Amy who spent 36 years alone: 36 years of cold, hard reality. Her Doctor didn’t save her. The truth is that the Doctor cannot save everyone and some of his friends die in the course of their adventures with him and Amy did die in this episode, just the younger one survived.

This episode was a vibrant-a visual delight. The look of the centre re-asserted the idea that in the future everything will be sterilised, clean and white.

In many ways, The Girl Who Waited is the budget episode. It features very few guest stars and mostly focuses on the principal cast and it’s spectacular for it. Murray Gold has done it again; his musical score manages to tug at the heartstrings a little bit more. This episode deserves all the high praise it receives. Let’s just hope that next week’s episode, The God Complex, can make the good episode run four-for-four.

Listen to our podcast review here.

Episode 42: Let’s Kill Hitler

Martyn, Gerrod and Pete look at Doctor Who: Let’s Kill Hitler.



The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to Amazon Music, PodchaserPlayer FM, Stitcher, and Apple Podcasts.

Check out our Youtube.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Socials:

Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Pete – @BeeblePete

Sam-@Sammichaelcomic

Instagram:

Martyn-@BadWilf