Episode 220: Doctor Who-Spyfall 1+2

Happy New Year!

In our first episode of 2020, Martyn, Chris and Sam discuss the first two episodes of series 12 of Doctor Who ‘Spyfall’.

Martyn discusses Sounds of thunder SOFT annual 2019. Follow them on Twitter.

Sam has launched a Facebook page and a Youtube channel.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as; but not limited to:

Audioboom, Player FM and iTunes.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Check out Chris’ other podcast, We Sound Familiar.

Follow the Bad Wilf team on Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Sam-@Sammichaelcomic

Chris-@ChrisWalkerT

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Episdode 219: Doctor Who Christmas specials-The RTD years

In which Martyn, Sam and Chris discuss the Doctor Who Christmas specials, that were overseen by Russell T Davies.

Sam has launched a Facebook page and a Youtube channel.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as; but not limited to:

Audioboom, Player FM and iTunes.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Check out Chris’ other podcast, We Sound Familiar.

Follow the Bad Wilf team on Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Sam-@Sammichaelcomic

Chris-@ChrisWalkerT

Please assist us to serve you better, by filling out this survey. Takes less than 2mins.

Episode 218: Sil and the devil seeds of Ardor

Martyn, Pete and Sam discuss the original drama from the world of Doctor Who, featuring SIL, the ruthless alien entrepreneur from planet Thoros Beta, played by Nabil Shaban.

Check out Pete’s interviews with Nabil Shaban, Keith Barnfather and Sophie Aldred.

Chris is taking part in Movember, find out how to donate here.

Sam has launched a Facebook page.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as; but not limited to: Audioboom, Player FM and iTunes.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Check out Chris’ other podcast, We Sound Familiar.

Follow the Bad Wilf team on Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Sam-@Sammichaelcomic

Chris-@ChrisWalkerT

Episode 217: The Mask (1994)

Martyn and Gerrod sit down to discuss 1994’s The Mask.

The Mask is a 1994 comedy directed by Charles Russell, produced by Bob Engelman, and written by Mike Werb, loosely based on the comic series of the same name published by Dark Horse Comics. The film stars Jim Carrey, Peter Riegert, Peter Greene, Amy Yasbeck, Richard Jeni, and Cameron Diaz in her film debut. It revolves around Stanley Ipkiss (Carrey), an unfortunate bank clerk who finds a magical mask that transforms him into a mischievous zoot-suited gangster.



The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as; but not limited to:

Audioboom, Player FM and iTunes.

If you’d like to support the show, then please check out our Ko-Fi, or shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you. We also have a Patreon.

Subscribe to We Sound Familiar.

Follow the Bad Wilf team on Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Sam-@Sammichaelcomic

Chris-@ChrisWalkerT

Please assist us to serve you better, by filling out this survey. Takes less than 2mins.

Episode 212:Doctor Who-The Two Doctors

With Hernadez on the run, it falls on Chris and Martyn to cover the Doctor Who story ‘The Two Doctors’.

The Two Doctors is the fourth serial of the 22nd season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was broadcast in three weekly parts on BBC1 from 16 February to 2 March 1985.

The serial is set on an alien space station and in and around Seville. In the serial, the alien time traveller the Sixth Doctor (Colin Baker), his former travelling companion Jamie McCrimmon (Frazer Hines) and his current companion Peri Brown (Nicola Bryant) work to save the younger Second Doctor (Patrick Troughton) from the bio-geneticist Dastari (Laurence Payne), who intends to steal the knowledge of how to travel in time from the Second Doctor’s genetic make-up.



The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as-but not limited to;

Audioboom, Player fm and iTunes.

If you’d like to support the show, then please check out our Ko-Fi, or shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you. We also have a Patreon.

Check out our Youtube.

Subscibe to We Sound Familiar.

Follow the Bad Wilf team on Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Pete – @BeeblePete

Sam-@Sammichaelcomic

Chris-@ChrisWalkerT

Please assist us to serve you better, by filling out this survey. Takes less than 2mins.

 

Episode 211: The talons of Weng-Chiang/ El Camino

Martyn and Chris discuss the Doctor Who episode, The talons of Weng-Chiang. They also discuss the recent recreation of Mission to the unknown, by Lancashire University.

After that, Gerrod and Martyn then discuss El-Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie.

The Talons of Weng-Chiang is the sixth and final serial of the 14th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts on BBC One from 26 February to 2 April 1977. In the serial, which is set in 19th century London, the 51st century criminal Magnus (Michael Spice) travels to the city and poses as an ancient Chinese god to find his missing time machine.

El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie (or simply El Camino) is a 2019 American neo-westerncrime thriller film that serves as an epilogue to the television series Breaking Bad. Series creator Vince Gilligan wrote, directed, and produced the film, while Aaron Paul reprised his role as Jesse Pinkman. The plot follows what happens to Pinkman following the events of the series finale. Several actors, including Jesse Plemons, Krysten Ritter, Jonathan Banks, and Bryan Cranston, reprise their original roles from the series, all of them appearing in flashback sequences. El Camino was also the final film to feature Robert Forster, who died on the day of its release.

El-Camino 27:21:00

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as-but not limited to;

Audioboom, Player fm and iTunes.

If you’d like to support the show, then please check out our Ko-Fi, or shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Check out our Youtube.

Subscibe to We Sound Familiar.

Follow the Bad Wilf team on Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Pete – @BeeblePete

Sam-@Sammichaelcomic

Chris-@ChrisWalkerT

 

Episode 210:Pulp Fiction

Gerrod gives up 20 minutes of his lunch time, to discuss Pulp Fiction with Martyn.

Pulp Fiction is a 1994 crime drama, written and directed by Quentin Tarantino, who conceived it with Roger Avary. Starring John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Bruce Willis, Tim Roth, Ving Rhames, and Uma Thurman, it tells several stories of criminal Los Angeles. The title refers to the pulp magazines and hardboiled crime novels popular during the mid-20th century, known for their graphic violence and punchy dialogue.

The lives of two mob hitmen, a boxer, a gangster and his wife, and a pair of diner bandits intertwine in four tales of violence and redemption.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as-but not limited to;

Audioboom, Player fm and iTunes.

If you’d like to support the show, then please check out our Ko-Fi, or shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Become a Patron!

Check out our Youtube.

Subscibe to We Sound Familiar.

Follow the Bad Wilf team on Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Pete – @BeeblePete

Sam-@Sammichaelcomic

Chris-@ChrisWalkerT

Episode 209-Doctor Who: The Three Doctors

Martyn is joined by Sam Michael and Chris Walker-Thomson, as the trio discuss the 1973 Doctor Who anniversary special ‘The Three Doctors’.

The serial opened the tenth anniversary year of the series, and features the first three Doctors all appearing in the same serial. This makes it the first Doctor Who story in which an earlier incarnation of the Doctor returns to the show.

The solar engineer Omega (Stephen Thorne), the creator of the experiments that allowed the Time Lords to travel in time, seeks revenge on the Time Lords after he was left for dead in a universe made of antimatter. The Time Lords recruit the time travellers the First Doctor (William Hartnell), the Second Doctor (Patrick Troughton), and the Third Doctor (Jon Pertwee) for help when Omega drains their civilisation’s power.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as-but not limited to;

Audioboom, Player fm and iTunes.

If you’d like to support the show, then please check out our Ko-Fi. Or shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Subscibe to We Sound Familiar.

Follow the Bad Wilf team on Twitter:

Follow the Bad Wilf team on Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Pete – @BeeblePete

Sam-@Sammichaelcomic

Chris-@ChrisWalkerT

Review – Space: 1999 – Breakout

This is Wilf Base Alpha.

I cannot know if you will receive this message but I’ve just heard ‘Breakaway,’ the new Space: 1999 audio drama from Big Finish.

Why would they do this? This ‘reimagining’ of the TV programme from Gerry and Sylvia Anderson, who brought us the likes of Thunderbirds, Captain Scarlet and UFO. Twenty years to the day after the 13th of September 1999, when the events of the original 1975 series began.

The Andersons and producer Reg Hill were known for intricately beautiful miniature effects and stylish designs in futuristic adventures on the small screen, the sort of thing parents show their kids when when they want them to grow up to be engineers.

By the time Space: 1999 was broadcast they’d made some progress toward widening their audience, mixing their love of technology and thrills with some nice moments of humanity. But the programme remained primarily a visual spectacle.

Big Finish love stories, however, and this one’s worth bringing into the future. A cataclysm with dire consequences for all Humanity is played out on the eve of its first foray to a distant planet.

A mysterious and deadly illness strikes the pilots of Eagle transporters, spacecraft servicing space voyage preparations at Moonbase Alpha. The base’s chief medical officer Helena Russell is aided in her search for a cure by John Koenig, who flies out from Earth to take command of the lunar city. As the nature of the disease becomes apparent, the scope of their crisis expands to disastrous proportions.

Big Finish have invigorated the adventure with a better sense of pace (that’s not to say they don’t let moments hang where they should) and a refreshing emphasis on character drama. The delightful gadgets of the original ‘1999’ can still be heard in use – Eagles, Moonbase travel tubes and hand-held Commlocks – it’s just that a model-maker’s sort of skill is instead applied to the intricacy of the soundscape.

There’s an interesting use of music in this story. Beyond simply hinting and sweetening action in progress, composer Benji Clifford inserts brief musical interludes to excite us in tantalising moments, such as the retrieval of an escape pod containing an unidentified passenger. Fans of the original series will appreciate familiar melodies amid the score, in addition to a familiar but fresh version of the original theme tune.

The unique selling point of this audio drama is no gimmick: it’s obeisance to the fact that what happens with the characters is everything. It makes this speculative exercise of the imagination into something we respond to as if it were really happening. Eagle transporters are cool but the challenge of surviving one crashing is really where it’s at.

Commander Koenig is played by Mark Bonnar, an actor familiar to Doctor Who viewers as the working father Jimmy in The Matt Smith story Rebel Flesh and as the supervillian known as The Eleven, who besets Paul McGann’s Doctor in audio. Mark hails from Edinburgh and follows the likes of Hugh Laurie in delivering an American accent good enough to live in. His Koenig is very relatable; the pain of each challenge glows darkly over him but his endurance shines brightly.

Maria Teresa Creasey is a new name to many of us – California born and New York educated, she’s nonetheless been rolled into a variety of UK productions. The Dr Russell she plays here is refreshingly active in the way she squares off against the impossible situation presented. It allows us to get get a good sense of her character early on. Big Finish have assembled a good pair of leaders in Creasey and Bonnar.

This 2019 view of an imagined, futuristic past makes an interesting novelty. A particular ‘minced oath’ dropped by Helene is a few years out of date by our standards but it comes from a time far beyond 1975. It’s not too far off from 1999, though. It kept me on my toes as I speculated on what might and might not be possible for the inhabitants of this story’s world.

A contemporary zeitgeist captured here (and one of my favourite Anglicisms) is brinkmanship. Both versions of ‘Breakaway’ begin by hiding Moonbase’s dire situation from Koenig but here, the stakes are higher: crowds of the general public are on Alpha, unaware of the expanding epidemic of pilot illness. The administration on Earth responds to this by redoubling its efforts to cover it all up.

Writer/director Nicholas Briggs has sanded smooth a number of rough edges that marred the uneven TV pilot. Sci-fi’s best known writer Isaac Asimov famously had a go at the old series’ scientific implausibility. The fantastic catastrophe played out in audio presents us with a nice combination of nods to real science and plausible fantasy. This puts our focus back on the drama and adds weight to its consequences.

Flawed as it was, the old Space: 1999 sometimes captured the awe felt by those of us who remember the Apollo space programme. I can barely wait to hear how this new crew face the unknown because what we can count on is that the characters and situations here are in good hands.

Space: 1999 – ‘Breakaway’ is available now from Big Finish.

Beeblepete out.

Review – Rose Tyler: The Dimension Cannon

The Dimension Cannon gives the character Rose Tyler her own series, in four audio dramas by Big Finish Productions. Billie Piper reprises her role as the first of The Doctor’s travelling companions in 21st century Doctor Who.

Shop girl turned sci-fi action hero Rose Tyler is consigned to a parallel universe with her mum, Jackie (Camille Coduri) and a parallel version of her dear departed dad, Pete (Shaun Dingwall). They’ve turned their attention to helping protect not only their world from extraordinary threats but also many other Earths. They’re following in the footsteps of Rose’s beloved Doctor: the charismatic, time-travelling space alien whose defence of Rose’s Earth left her separated from it – and him.

The Dimension Cannon offers Rose a chance to bring The Doctor back into the fight – and into her life again. For short periods of time the cannon allows her to visit other parallel universes that offer clues to the whereabouts of The Doctor. On her first trip she’s reunited with a parallel version of Clive, a conspiracy theorist who was murdered in Rose’s universe. Bark Benton reprises the role of Clive throughout the set and it’s good fun to have him back.

The four stories take us to four new parallel versions of London, where we’re introduced to startling alternate versions of the well-loved characters that head up this series. This collection of audios is not so much a spin-off from Doctor Who as it’s a spiritual follow-on from ‘Father’s Day,’ the episode that introduced us to the ‘original’ Pete Tyler and led us through dark times leading up to his death.

Chasing The Doctor inevitably means getting to know the locals in each different London and Rose finds she already knows many of them all too well. She gets personally involved in the lives of the people she meets, encountering Jackie, Pete and others in slightly different forms. It makes arriving in each universe a treat for the listener – and leaving each of them is tough all round.

Big Finish tie-in plays lure us into the audio realm by offering us characters and situations that are proven successes on television. They honour these successes with intriguing stories that at least equal their predecessors in quality. Rose’s story in Doctor Who has a lot of heart – and heartbreak. These new tales are equally engaging character pieces.

By presenting so many alternate versions of the original roles played by the cast, the normally-invisible work of the actors gets a bit of a peek into the limelight. I was properly immersed in and moved by the drama here but I also enjoyed listening for the subtle differences between the characters parallel to each other.

I’m very much opposed to more for more’s sake; I hate seeing delightful series run down by commercial supplements. You’ll find none of that here in Rose Tyler: The Dimension Cannon. This box set revisits the Tylers in a clever way that gives us more of what we’re counting on in ways that constantly surprise.

Rose Tyler: The Dimension Cannon is available now from Big Finish.