Episode 192:Sylvester McCoy and Jim Cummings

In which Martyn and Gerrod bring you an interview with Sylvester McCoy and, Jim “Winnie The Pooh” Cummings.

The podcast can be accessed via different places, including Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

Follow the Bad Wilf team:

Martyn- @BadWilf

Pete-@BeeblePete

Gerrod-@gerrod_edward

Also check out the official Bad Wilf Vlog.

Episode 191:Class interview

In which Martyn attends the MCM expo and interviews the cast of Class.

Check out our interview with Sylvester McCoy.

The podcast can be accessed via different places, including Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

Follow the Bad Wilf team:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod – @gerrod_edward

Also check out the official Bad Wilf Vlog.

Interview-Russell T Davies and Steven Moffat

HOW DID YOU FEEL WHEN YOU WERE TOLD OF PLANS TO NOVELISE NEW SERIES DOCTOR WHO EPISODES?

RTD: I was very excited! I’d collected Target books as a kid, so it felt like closing a circle. And I wanted to test myself too, I was interested to find out what the process would be like. And to look back on an old piece of work after 13 years was fascinating.

SM: Well, surprised – I knew nothing of the plans, because this all started around the time I was leaving. The biggest surprise, though, was that I actually wanted to novelise The Day Of The Doctor. I had a hell of a time on that script, I had no idea I wanted to revisit it!

WHAT DID THE ORIGINAL TARGET DOCTOR WHO BOOKS MEAN TO YOU, GROWING UP?

RTD: I loved them. I’ve still got them all, on a shelf here in my office! In the days before DVD or streaming, they were the only official records of an adventure. And they were so mysterious, detailing stories we thought we’d never see again. Some we still won’t, because they’re missing from the archive. I can probably tell you where I was, which shop I was in when I bought it, for every single one of my Target originals.

SM: Every time I’d go to a bookshop – and I was a keen reader, so I went a lot – I’d head straight to the Doctor Who book section. Because I’d stared at all the book covers I already owned with such manic intensity, they were carved into my brain like wounds – so I could tell from right across the shop, by the tiniest variation in colour or artwork, if there was a new one on the shelf, and if there was my heart would leap. Then, sometimes, I’d wake up. So you could say I was – y’know – over invested. I think that’s the polite way of putting it.

WHAT ELSE DID YOU READ AS A CHILD? DID THE ORIGINAL TARGETS LEAD YOU INTO OTHER SERIES OR AUTHORS?

RTD: I read anything and everything. Enid Blyton! Tolkien. C.S. Lewis. Agatha Christie. Dune. Jaws. I was a voracious reader, I still am, I was trying D.H. Lawrence by the time I was 11. A lot of young readers will tell you that Targets led them onto many other books, which is brilliant, but frankly, I was there already!

SM: I’m very old, so I was already a voracious reader before the Target series got started – I loved the Narnia books, and The Hobbit, and especially Tom’s Midnight Garden. Reading and Doctor Who were my two favourite things. But the thing I wanted more than anything was to combine my enthusiasms. I longed for there to be Doctor Who books! There were Star Trek books, so it didn’t seem fair there weren’t any Doctor Who ones. And then, suddenly there they were. I was on holiday in Cornwall, in a little town called Mevagissey, and in a shop called Dunns there was a solitary rack of books which I’d always walk round and round, looking for something to read – then one day my Dad grabbed and my arm and pointed to the bottom row of paperbacks: Doctor Who And The Daleks, Doctor Who And The Zarbi and Doctor Who And The Crusaders. I was so happy!

HOW DID YOU APPROACH THE TASK OF NOVELISING YOUR OWN SCRIPT?

RTD: It was tricky, I wanted to capture the essence of the TV episode, but I didn’t want to repeat it. I’d long since lost the scripts! I’m always asked to give away Doctor Who stuff for raffles and prizes, so everything has gone. I found a transcript online, and someone found me a copy of the very first draft. But I didn’t always look at them. I was a bit more freefalling. Or rather, I wanted to add stuff to most of the dialogue because I knew fans would know a lot of it off by heart already, so there had to be new things to discover.

SM: I just sort of started. I had a few ideas about how it might translate, but really, as with any writing, I just dived in. I found the shooting script on my hard drive, and was shocked to see how much I’d altered it during filming. Quite often, I’d have to watch the DVD and transcribe useful bits of dialogue, because I found I had no written record of really quite important scenes. Then, of course, you find the parts that don’t quite work in prose. The shock of seeing David and Matt together, John Hurt as the Doctor, surprise appearances by Tom Baker and Peter Capaldi – you have to find a way to make those moments work in a book, without surprise guest stars, which can be a challenge.

HOW DID THE EXPERIENCE OF WRITING A NOVEL COMPARE TO WRITING A TV SCRIPT?

RTD: It’s all hard work! But it’s a different focus. That became clear with the character of Mickey, Rose’s long-suffering boyfriend. On screen, played brilliantly by Noel Clarke, he flies past, he’s wonderful, he’s fast and fun and furious, but when a novel goes inside someone’s head, I had to give him more focus. Also, bear in mind, on TV, I knew I had 13 episodes to tell Mickey’s story, but in a one-off book, I had to complete him a bit more.

SM: When you write a screenplay, you make the audience a witness to events. When you write a book, you make the reader experience them. You go from the grandeur of spectacle to the intimacy of inside someone’s head. I don’t think either is better than the other, but they are different. Twists and turns, suspense, humour – they all work in different ways. You’re aiming for the same effects, but by other means.

IN A WORLD WHERE THE ORIGINAL SHOW CAN BE ACCESSED IN A DOZEN WAYS ON DEMAND, WHAT PLACE DOES A NOVELISATION HAVE?

RTD: New stuff! Newness. Sheer newness. New action, new dialogue and new insights. A fan might have seen something a dozen times, so I felt honour-bound to add things that could only be found inside the pages of the book. And I know what fandom feels like, there’s nothing we love more than discovering something new about something old.

SM: Well, we’ll find out, won’t we? Back when the Targets started, those books were our only permanent record. The shows were on your telly exactly once, and then disappeared forever, like smoke up the chimney. Back then, Terrance Dicks would give us perfect, prose replicas of the originals, scene for scene, line for line, and very brilliantly done. He’d also do sly little fixes on the plotting when he felt inclined. But a few years later – from about Peter Davison on, I think – we all had VCRs, and we could keep the originals exactly as they were so we didn’t need the prose replicas. So the Target books changed – more of the original writers got involved, and they became more like alternative versions. Perhaps that’s how it will go now? As I say, we’ll find out.

WERE YOU TEMPTED TO ‘GO BIGGER’ WITH THE ACTION, UNFETTERED BY BUDGET?

RTD: Oh, a bit. A lot! Bear in mind, there’s a great big invasion of London by shop-window dummies at the end, so I’d paved the way for some epic action. On screen, the London Eye just sits there in the background. In this version, it’s a lot more involved! I loved writing that stuff.

And writing action is hard – seeing a bullet fly on screen is easy, describing it in prose is much harder, so that was a good test.

SM: Sometimes, yes. I don’t think it’s the big difference. In a way, many of the finest creative decisions in Doctor Who are direct responses to budgetary limitations – there’s a reason the Doctor’s space ship looks like a phone box, and he spends a lot of time in dark tunnels – so its good to go epic, so long as you don’t lose the signature style. I’m not the first person to say it, but the clash of the epic and domestic is a big part of what makes the show what it is.

REVISITING AND RE-PRESENTING PAST WORK – DID YOU FEEL NOSTALGIC?

RTD: I just felt old! But I felt mighty proud. Rose was the first episode in 2005, and for all the changes to the show, it’s fundamentally still the same show.

SM: Too soon for me. Day was only five years ago, and I’ve barely finished as showrunner. I don’t think I’ll ever feel nostalgia for Doctor Who, exactly – I think it will just carry on being my favourite show on TV, and I’ll have fond memories of having worked on it once.

WITH THESE NOVELISATIONS UNDER YOUR BELT WOULD YOU CONSIDER WRITING FURTHER BOOKS – EITHER FOR WHO OR SOMETHING ELSE ENTIRELY?

RTD: I think it’s more exciting to consider something new, now. I really loved writing this, and I think the chance to write brand new stories with brand new characters would be exhilarating. One day!

SM: Hugely enjoyed writing the book. Very much indeed. So yes, I hope I get another go at prose, in whatever form.

Episode 188: Daniel Lawrence Taylor

In which Martyn chats to actor/writer Daniel Lawrence Taylor.

The pair talk about writing to deadlines, the pressure of social media and Daniel’s ITV2 show, Time Wasters.

The podcast can be accessed via different places, including Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

You can follow Daniel on Twitter-@DanielTaylor247

Follow the Bad Wilf team:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod – @Gerrod_Edward

Also check out the official Bad Wilf Vlog.

Episode 187: Gareth David-Lloyd interview

In which Martyn chats to Gareth David-Lloyd about his latest project, Black River meadow. They also talk about the Ianto Shrine.

You can support Gareth here.

You can follow Gareth on Twitter.

The podcast can be accessed via different places, including Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

Follow the Bad Wilf team:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod – @Gerrod_Edward

Also check out the official Bad Wilf Vlog.

Interview-David Bradley and Claudia Grant

Recorded, at MCM London 2017, here’s the full press panel with David Bradley and Claudia Grant.

Both talk about their involvement with An adventure in space and time and Big Finish. David talks about his experiences on the upcoming Christmas special, twice upon a time.


Full catherine Tate panel from MCM

Last week, Catherine Tate took part in a Q&A at London’s MCM comic con.

It’s extrememly funny and Catherine is exactly how you’d like her to be.

 

Andrew Lee Potts interview

We attended the MCM expo, in London this weekend. Here’s the interview with Andrew Lee Potts. He discusses Primeval, Wireless and tells me to get off my butt and finish my web series.

There’s a transcribbed version below the video.

 

BW:

So, Andrew. You’re obviously no stranger to these events. What is it that keeps you coming back to MCM?

ALP:

Well, I’m a big kid at heart. Also, getting that recognition for what you do, is really nice.

That’s why I first liked it. Actually chatting to the fans and the families who liked Primeval, for example, was really lovely. And once I started Wireless, which is my web show. They [MCM] got really behind it and started screening the episodes and a little fanbase started for the show. Here we are today and, I’ve actually filmed my first episode at MCM comic con. Which has been brilliant.

BW:

Do fans have common questions, in regards to Primeval and Wireless. What are the most common ones?

ALP:

Oh, gosh. ‘When’s Primeval coming back?’ Is the biggest one, I’ll get asked that a million times today.


BW:

So, when is it coming back?

ALP:

(Laughs) I’ll say to you, what I say to them [the fans]. I’ve got no idea, I’ve not spoken to the producers, or anything. I know they still love the show. I have some sort of gut feeling, they may re-visit it. I think they should-as a brand.

I think it’s still strong. I think it would still work. I don’t know whether we’d be involved in that, as characters. But, I do think they should revisit Primeval.

I’ve got a little girl who is 6 now and, she loves dinosaurs and it’s a cool family thing. That’s what I love the most, is seeing the whole families together, going ‘Oh, yeah. I used to watch this with my granddad’. I just love that feeling about it.

So, no plans yet. But, it wouldn’t surprise me. I also get asked about CGI, a lot.

BW:

What was in like when you went to Canada, to work on that series [Primeval:New world]?

ALP:

Oh, it was cool. I did Alice for The SyFy channel, where I played the Mad Hatter and I was out there for four months, I fell in love with Vancouver. It’s one of my favourite places in the world.

So, to go back there to do Primeval was cool. I was honoured to be asked as well.

On the first night I got there, it was a night shoot. It was raining heavily. It had a big crew. A lot bigger than our crew, they had more money than we had. Which was all cool to see.

I went on to set and the showrunner said ‘Ladies and gentleman, Andrew Lee Potts. The reason we’re all here’.

So, it was just nice, you know? To see that it had travelled. The new cast members were full of questions about the show. It was a good experience and, I got very close with Nyle. Who played Evan Cross. On my honeymoon, he let me stay in his posh apartment in LA. So, I got something out of it (Laughs).


BW:

Is there anything you feel is unfinished about your character’s story?

ALP:

Well, we know they’re married [Connor and Abbie]. Because I reveal that in new world. I would have liked to have seen Connor as the team leader. I think he was going that way. He’d earnt his stripes in that sense.

I thought it would be great to have the ARC academy, or something. Training newbies, but Abbie and Connor as a married couple. Because obviously, she’s good at all the kicking butt stuff and, he’s the technical side. That would lend itself to quite a lot of comedy, in their dynamic. It’d be quite nice to see them have a baby, then they’ve got something else to protect. There’s a lot of things they could do, I guess. And, get more guns. Always give Connor more guns.

BW:

Is working in sci-fi more rewarding than any other genre, because you get to come to things like this? [MCM comic con].

ALP:

That’s a good question. Primeval, Alice and that genre have given me a lot. They’ve helped me integrate with the fans a lot more.

Yeah, you do get more from it. For someone like me, who loves sci-fi. It’s great to be apart of a celebration, of the work you’re involved in and that’s why these cons are great.

Before Primeval, I’d done a lot of drama and, I’d played a lot of baddies. It was good, because I’ve got a pretty versatile career. So, therefore, you get called in for a lot of different types of roles. But, as for walking down the street, it was easy. But now it’s changed, is the thing I would say. If I didn’t embrace a show like Primeval, or a character people seem to like a lot. It would get annoying. But, I do and I’m proud of playing the character.


BW:

It’s almost a unique sort of fame, isn’t it? You have a cult following here [MCM]

ALP:

Oh, I can’t walk round here. Especially in a hat like this.

But, Yeah. I do get recognised. My voice is apparently quite distinctive. I get clocked for my voice all the time, if I’m on the phone. But, yeah. You do get so much back. It still surprises me how many people want to talk about Primeval. It’s become cult now, it is. Otherwise people wouldn’t still be talking about it.

BW:

Is there anything you took away from your experience on Primeval?

ALP:

As a person, I think I became a lot more humble. It’s funny when you get fame for something and, it happened quite quickly for Primeval.

Because, it was Saturday night TV. It was big and it had lots of bells and whistles on. We were on posters all over the tube.

Hannah was already used to it, as she was already famous. But I wasn’t. So, I kind of became really humble. It’s funny when you’re trying to become an actor and you’re trying to prove yourself and you want recognition, you want people to be talking about you online. Because that’s how you know you’ve arrived and when it happens, you go ‘Oh. Okay, that’s that then’. You stop chasing as much. You start listening a bit more, taking people’s feedback on a little bit more.

So, it’s made me more humble. We worked really hard on Primeval. We all got really close, as a team and, you know. I direct Wireless, so I’ve got a bit of a director’s head. So, I always side with the crew. I’ve always got lots of friends within the crew. I see how hard they work and try to help them however I can.

BW:

You did some stuff for the Primeval DVD, right?

ALP:

I did the making of Primeval. I also did webisodes. Any extra curricular things, they just went ‘Go on, Andrew’ll do it’. So, I did a lot of extra stuff for them. But, I enjoyed it.

BW:

Did you still anything from the show?

ALP:

Oh, yeah. I’m terrible at that. Significant character stuff, like the ring I wear around my neck That’s been in every episode. The earpieces, the black box. Anything I could put in my pocket, really. I would’ve had one of the big T-Rex or Raptor models if I could’ve got away with it. Lots of costumes, anything I could. Really.

BW:

Do you have any stand out memories from primeval?

ALP:

When we walked into the ARC. The set they built for the second season. It was like, ‘I think we’re doing something right’. Because I’ve done a lot of shows, a lot of shows of varying budgets before Primeval. Then I walked on to that set, that looked like something out of James Bond and we were like ‘Okay, this is our world now, isn’t it?’ and they [ITV] said ‘Yeah and, we’re making toys’.

That sort of stuff was insane. I went to the toy factory, to see my toy being made. That’s cool, no one can ever take that away from me.

BW:

Did they 3D scan you?

ALP:

They didn’t 3D scan me. They did it from photos, actually. They would take pictures from different angles and they did the original sculpts by hand-the same guys who do the Doctor Who figures. They were fantastic, absolutely fantastic.

So, they got all the heads over to impossible pictures, who were like ‘Yeah that ones good. That ones good. Good, good’. They got to mine and said ‘That looks too good looking to be Andrew. Can you do something to his face?’ So, my character is smirking. I look like I’ve had a stroke. It still looks like me, but I don’t know whether to take it as a compliment or a diss.

BW:

What would you say, on your character’s grave stone?

ALP:

That’s quite depressing that, innit? ‘I’M NOT DEAD’. I think I had a few little things that people caught on to, one was ‘La Connor Temple’. So maybe it should say ‘La Connor Temple’ and underneath ‘Pretty sexy stuff’. Which is what I said, whenever I saw a new gadget or something. La Connor Temple, pretty sexy stuff (laughs).

BW:

What advice would you give someone who wants to start their own webseries?

ALP:

Oh, gosh. Do it! Just do it. I’ve been asked this a lot. People just procrastinate and talk about doing it.

You’ve gotta do it, you’ve got to experience it. You’ve got to learn from it. I’ve made so many mistakes on Wireless, on the technical side of stuff. But, that’s why I love doing it. It just teaches you so much and, I’m a bit of a sponge anyway.

So, just get off your butt and do it. Film it on your phone. You can get basic editing packages now and put it online, on youtube. That’s all I do.

I’m no different to the next person. I just know a few more actors. That’s the only difference. That is the only difference, I can get a few actors in that are professionals. Who, very kindly do it for free. Because they see my passion, within it. But, you know. I’ve been making films since I was 13, on any sort of camera I could get my hands on. You’ve got no excuses, if you want to do it, you’ve just got to do it. Be creative. Make mistakes.

BW:

I guess there’s no gatekeepers anymore. There’s nobody telling you, you can’t.

ALP:

Well, that’s the thing. That’s why I did Wireless. I wanted to be the boss of something, creatively. I wanted to put my vision out there. If people like it, they like it. If they don’t, they don’t. Gladly, hopefully, they seem to like it. I still enjoy doing it. I can’t stop doing it. I’m addicted. But, there’s no rehab.

 

Follow Andrew Lee Potts on Twitter.

Check out wireless.

Price: £5.00