Episode 12: The Wilfs of Fenric

In episode 12 of the podcast, we discuss The Doctor Who: The Curse of Fenric, The Star Wars 3D re-releases and much, much more.

They also check out Him & Her, Get Him to the Greek and, Sesame Street: True Mud.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to;

Podchaser, Player FM, Stitcher and Apple Podcasts.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Check out our Youtube.

Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Episode 11: Human Nature

In episode 11,  Gerrod and I stay the most on-topic we have ever been. We discuss Doctor Who: Human Nature.

Human Nature” is the eighth episode of the third series of the revived British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was originally broadcast on BBC One on 26 May 2007. It is the first episode of a two-part story written by Paul Cornell adapted from his 1995 Doctor Who novel Human Nature. Its second part, “The Family of Blood”, aired on 2 June. Along with “The Family of Blood”, it was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form in 2008.[1]

In the episode, the alien time traveler the Tenth Doctor (David Tennant) hides from his pursuers, the Family of Blood, in 1913 England. He transforms himself into a human and implants the false persona of a schoolteacher called “John Smith” to avoid detection until the Family’s life runs out.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to;

Podchaser, Player FM, Stitcher and Apple Podcasts.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Check out our Youtube.

Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Episode 10: Hulk Boobs

Martyn and Gerrod discuss Sherlock, Doctor Who: The Lodger, a pair of Hulk boobs and the recent interview with Torchwood’s Kai Owen. They also get Glen’s view on Doctor Who.

The Lodger” is the eleventh episode of the fifth series of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, first broadcast on BBC One on 12 June 2010. It was written by Gareth Roberts, who based the story on his 2006 Doctor Who Magazine comic strip “The Lodger”.

The episode features the Doctor (Matt Smith) stranded on Earth and separated from his companion Amy Pond (Karen Gillan), when an unknown force prevents his time-traveling spaceship, the TARDIS, from landing. To investigate, he moves into the flat of Craig Owens (James Corden) and attempts to fit in with ordinary humans while unknowingly playing matchmaker for Craig and his good friend Sophie (Daisy Haggard).

Episode 4: Bad Wilf Harder

In this episode, Gerrod and I are joined by our good friend Glen. Glen has never seen Doctor Who, so we showed him, Rose and Blink.

Rose” is the opening episode of the first series of the revived British science fiction television programme Doctor Who. The episode was directed by Keith Boak and written by Russell T Davies who was also one of the three executive producers. It was originally broadcast in the UK on BBC One on 26 March 2005. “Rose” was the first Doctor Who episode to air since the Doctor Who television film in 1996.

In the episode, the London department store worker Rose Tyler (Billie Piper) gets caught in the middle of the alien time traveler the Doctor’s (Christopher Eccleston) plot to prevent an invasion of the Earth by the Nestene Consciousness (voiced by Nicholas Briggs) and the Autons after the Doctor destroys Rose’s workplace.

Blink” is the tenth episode of the third series of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It was originally broadcast on 9 June 2007 on BBC One. The episode was directed by Hettie MacDonald and is the only episode in the 2007 series written by Steven Moffat. The episode is based on a previous short story written by Moffat for the 2006 Doctor Who Annual, entitled “‘What I Did on My Christmas Holidays’ By Sally Sparrow”.

In the episode, the Tenth Doctor—a time-traveling alien played by David Tennant—is trapped in 1969 and tries to communicate with a young woman in 2007, Sally Sparrow (Carey Mulligan), to prevent the statue-like Weeping Angels from taking control of the TARDIS. Sparrow and her best friend’s brother, Larry Nightingale (Finlay Robertson), must unravel a set of cryptic clues sent through time by the marooned Doctor, left in DVD Easter eggs.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to;

Podchaser, Player FM, Stitcher and Apple Podcasts.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Episode 03: The Three Doctors

In episode 3, we speak about ‘The Three Doctors’ but Skype traps Gerrod in a time eddy and Martyn has to go solo.

The Three Doctors is the first serial of the tenth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 30 December 1972 to 20 January 1973.

In the serial, the solar engineer Omega (Stephen Thorne), the creator of the experiments that allowed the Time Lords to travel in time, seeks revenge on the Time Lords after he was left for dead in a universe made of antimatter. The Time Lords recruit the time travelers the First Doctor (William Hartnell), the Second Doctor (Patrick Troughton), and the Third Doctor (Jon Pertwee) for help when Omega drains their civilisation’s power.

The serial opened the tenth anniversary year of the series and features the first three Doctors all appearing in the same serial. This makes it the first Doctor Who story in which an earlier incarnation of the Doctor returns to the show.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to;

Podchaser, Player FM, Stitcher and Apple Podcasts.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Doctor Who audio review: The Sirens of Time


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In practice, the story’s shape gets in the way. Gallifrey is in a state of crisis, facing destruction at the hands of an overwhelming enemy. And the Doctor is involved in three different incarnations – each caught up in a deadly adventure, scattered across time and space. The web of time is threatened – and someone wants the Doctor dead. The three incarnations of the Doctor must join together to set time back on the right track – but in doing so, will they unleash a still greater threat? (synopsis)

In The Sirens of Time, fan service is performed to a five-star degree. In the first moment of Part One, a Gallifreyan tannoy voice delivers an alert in accurate, Deadly Assassin style. The meeting of the Doctors’ minds later on is a good mix of the sound heard in The Three Doctors and something better suited to accompany the memory flashbacks that the three share.

Each of the three Doctors get an episode to themselves then converge in the conclusion. In practice, this story structure is a bit disorienting. The three short pieces don’t get much time to develop before the fourth on Gallifrey gets into gear. Although the plot seems to have no holes it doesn’t come together in the way I imagine the makers hoped.

Doctor Who is usually better for me in reruns and this was no exception. Doubtless most of the actors will have completely forgotten having done this job but that’s fine with me; they’ve left behind some good performances. I hope they had some laughs and maybe earned a penny or two because my side of the equation’s worked out pretty well.

Check out the trailer.