Review-Terminator: Dark Fate

It’s no secret that the Terminator franchise has been in pretty bad shape for over two decades. First, a studio bought the rights to make Terminator 3: Rise of the machines, this was meant to jump-start a new trilogy. It didn’t. Then another studio bought the rights and made Terminator: Salvation. This was meant to jump-start a new trilogy. It didn’t, although the lighting was fantastic. Then, knowing there were only a few years left until the rights reverted back to James Cameron, another studio tried to cash in with the sequel/reboot Terminator: Genesis. This was meant to jump-start a new trilogy. It didn’t.


Finally, in 2017 the right reverted back to Cameron who acted as producer to this film, leaving the directing duties to Tim Miller (Deadpool). And this time, instead of focusing on John Connor, Terminator: Dark Fate follows his mother Sarah (Linda Hamilton) who is now older and battle weary. Her stare alone cuts through the screen with unwavering anger.

The main focus of this film is a young Mexican woman named Dani (Natalia Reyes). Dani is being chased by a new breed of Terminator, the Rev-9 (Gabriel Luna). Dani is being protected by an “enhanced” human from the future named Grace (Mackenzie Davis) who is able to trade blow-for-blow with a Terminator.

With Dark Fate, we get something of a reboot in terms of storytelling and in-universe continuity. Everything post-Terminator 2: Judgement Day, now exists in an alternate timeline that didn’t happen for these characters.

Dark Fate has a very different and interesting dynamic between the leads, even though she’s being protected. Dani isn’t a damsel in distress. She wants to fight, she knows she has to. She just doesn’t know-how. The film holds itself together pretty well, it respects its origins whilst building a new story. The action set pieces are fun and engaging, even if the CGI is a little dodgy at times.

Arnold Schwarzenegger also returns as another T-800-101 model and brings a bit more comedy to his role, than we normally see. He isn’t cracking jokes, but there are a few deadpan lines that break through the tension of the film.

The Rev-9 design is outstanding, easily the best Terminator we’ve seen since Robert Patrick’s T-1000. The Rev-9 is able to create a twin Terminator, to assist him with his mission.

Overall, I was really impressed by Terminator: Dark Fate. It’s a shame the audience has been burnt so many times by poor sequels, as this is more than a worthy successor for Terminator 2.

Episode 217: The Mask (1994)

Martyn and Gerrod sit down to discuss 1994’s The Mask.

The Mask is a 1994 comedy directed by Charles Russell, produced by Bob Engelman, and written by Mike Werb, loosely based on the comic series of the same name published by Dark Horse Comics. The film stars Jim Carrey, Peter Riegert, Peter Greene, Amy Yasbeck, Richard Jeni, and Cameron Diaz in her film debut. It revolves around Stanley Ipkiss (Carrey), an unfortunate bank clerk who finds a magical mask that transforms him into a mischievous zoot-suited gangster.



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Episode 210:Pulp Fiction

Gerrod gives up 20 minutes of his lunch time, to discuss Pulp Fiction with Martyn.

Pulp Fiction is a 1994 crime drama, written and directed by Quentin Tarantino, who conceived it with Roger Avary. Starring John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Bruce Willis, Tim Roth, Ving Rhames, and Uma Thurman, it tells several stories of criminal Los Angeles. The title refers to the pulp magazines and hardboiled crime novels popular during the mid-20th century, known for their graphic violence and punchy dialogue.

The lives of two mob hitmen, a boxer, a gangster and his wife, and a pair of diner bandits intertwine in four tales of violence and redemption.

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Episode 204: Shaft (2019)

Martyn and Gerrod only had 15mins spare when they recorded this, so here is a very brief review of Shaft (2019).

John Shaft Jr. may be an FBI cyber security expert, but to uncover the truth behind his best friend’s untimely death, he needs an education that only his dad can provide. Absent throughout his childhood, the legendary John Shaft agrees to help his son navigate the heroin-infested underbelly of Harlem, N.Y. Besides, the locked and loaded Shaft has his own score to settle — both professional and personal.

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Review-She’s Missing

This indie drama follows Heidi and her best friend Jane. When Jane vanishes without a trace. Heidi tries to make sense of the situation.

On a personal note, this film really resonated with me. I’ve spent time in small town America and these missing posters are a real life occurrence, especially near towns close to an interstate. People will vanish without a trace. Occasionally these people will re-emerge thousands of miles from home, but more often than not. They’re never found.

She’s missing perfectly captures Heidi’s quiet tedium from her moribund existence and juxtaposes it with Jane’s extremely volatile life. The film shines when it revels in the vastness of its Southwestern setting, which can lead to wide spread oppression and a feeling of utter hopelessness.

Alexandra McGuiness knows how to frame the perfect shot. The entire film felt very David Lynch to me. The back drop would fade from mountains to empty skyline. Accompanied by a somber score, this makes the viewer feel a sense of claustrophobic despondency, which is a stark contrast to the upbeat rodeo setting of the film.

She’s missing is the type of film Hollywood doesn’t really make any more, it’s well worth a watch. The film is a compelling struggle, which I think we can all identify with.

SHE’S MISSING is released on iTunes and On Demand from 1st July on Sky Store, Virgin Media, Google Play, Youtube and Amazon.

Episode 198: Avengers Endgame

As nobody else on the internet is talking about it, Martyn and Gerrod decided to take 19mins and 39 seconds out of their busy schedules. To bring you the only review for Avengers: Endgame, that you’ll be able to find.

Check out our previous Avengers reviews;

Avengers Assemble

Avengers: Age of Ultron

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Review-Fighting with my family

The idea for the film came about, when Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson watched a documentary one sleepless night. That documentary was ‘The Wrestlers: Fighting with My Family’. The next morning he called his good friend, The Office co-creator Stephen Merchant and pitched the idea. Merchant loved it and started writing the script immediately.

Paige and her brother Zak (Florence Pugh and Jack Lowden) were born into a wrestling family. They’ve spent their entire lives dreaming about leaving their small town of Norwich and heading to America, to join the WWE. Their parents (Nick Frost and Lena Heady) run a local wrestling club and have raised them to be champions. The pair both get called for WWE try outs, but only Paige makes the grade. She then heads off to Florida for training, whilst Zak is left in Norwich.

Although Stephen Merchant has been writing/directing films and TV for nearly 20 years, this is his first time going solo and he shines. His signature razor-sharp dialogue is present throughout. Fighting With My Family is the first great film of 2019, given that it’s Merchant’s baby, I went in expecting a feel-good, character-based comedy. This is much deeper than that. The laughs come thick and fast, but the film isn’t afraid to tone down the comedic elements, when the story calls for it and it. The dialogue and characters always feel authentic and, it never falls foul to any sports biopic tropes. There’s no unnecessary romantic subplot, even the “mean girls” cliché is wonderfully subverted.

This is also quite possibly the most realistic sibling relationship ever put on screen. Pugh and Lowden are instantly believable as brother and sister, their equal respect and jealously for each other is perfectly balanced.

Merchant has crafted a wonderful film, that excellently reflects the highs and lows that come with chasing your dreams, but it also teaches us that even if you don’t quite achieve what you’ve wanted. It doesn’t mean you’ve failed. This film will appeal to both wrestling fans and those, like me-who’ve never seen a match.

Blu Ray review-Reign of the supermen

Six months after Superman (Jerry O’Connell) sacrificed himself to defeat Doomsday, the world has been introduced to four new versions of the man of steel; Superboy, Steel, Cyborg-Superman, and the Eradicator. Each one of them is very different in their personalities and crime-fighting style compared to the original Man of Steel; leaving the world questioning which one, if any, is the true Superman.

At 87 minutes, this is one of the longer DC Universe Animated films. But the extra length enables it to achieve a number of things, such as continuing threads that were set up in ‘The Death of Superman’. We also get a great amount of character development, not only do we see some really touching moments between the Kents and Lois Lane (Rebecca Romijn). We also see Lois develop a friendship with Wonder Woman (Rosario Dawson). Lex Luthor also plays a very active role in this story-excellently voiced by Rainn Wilson. It also allows for the film to set up the wider DC animated universe.

Let’s just say, DC’s animation department has done it again. Reign of the Supermen is a triumph. Despite being based on a comic book from 1993, writers Tim Sheridan and Jim Krieg-along with director Sam Liu, manage to keep the film feeling fresh and engaging. They understand just how much the original comics mean to fans and expertly adapt them for the screen.

This is the kind of movie I wish DC’s live-action department were making. It’s got a darker/edgy tone, the heroes actions have consequences. But, it doesn’t take itself seriously. There’s a lot of fun to be had here.

REIGN OF THE SUPERMEN is available now on Digital Download, Blu-ray™ and DVD

The Blu Ray special features include;

Lex Luthor:The greatest nemesis

Sneak peak at Justice League vs The Fatal Five

From the vault-two bonus cartoons.

DVD review-The Festival

After his girlfriend Caitlin (Tointon) dumps him at graduation, Nick (Thomas) is convinced by his best friend Shane (Animashaun) to attend a music festival, they’d previously booked tickets for-even though it means running into her.

On the train, they meet the annoying Amy (O’Doherty).

Sure enough, they run into Caitlin and after a number of humiliating situations, Nick ends up getting himself and Shane arrested, which leads to Shane’s mum’s boyfriend(Clement) bailing them out.

Whilst the cast provide enough energy to make it watchable, the film feels like it’s made from rejected jokes from The Inbetweeners. Which makes sense considering it’s written by the shows co-creator and stars Joe Thomas.

The script is packed with gags-none of which land. In fact, some of the humour is so grotesque and tasteless that it’s jarring, alienating and cringe-worthy. The filmmakers abruptly cut scenes to distract from the thin plot and random set-pieces.

Jermaine Clement gives a great performance and steals every scene he’s in. Nick Frost and Noel Fielding manage to raise a few smiles, with their cameos. But there’s little substance here. Ultimately, the film feels like that random drunk guy on a train. Chattering endlessly, but never getting to a point.

Episode 193:The Running Man

In which Martyn and Gerrod discuss the 1987 film ‘The Running Man’.

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