Episode 268: Doctor Who am I?

Martyn and Pete are joined by Matthew Jacobs and Vanessa Yuille, who discuss their excellent documentary ‘Doctor Who am I?

Doctor Who am I? follows Matthew Jacobs, writer of the 1996 Doctor Who TV movie, as he is reluctantly dragged back into the American Whoniverse, in this funny and moving documentary about finding family in the unlikeliest of places.

Doctor Who am I? is currently screening in the UK, with American dates to follow. Check out Twitter and Facebook for more info. The Blu-ray and DVD are due for release on November 28th.

Twitter: Martyn, Pete, Sam, Gerrod,

Instagram: Martyn, Chris, Sam

 

Review-The Banshees of Inisherin

In 1923, on a tiny remote island, just off the coast of Ireland. Two friends find themselves at odds. When one of them decides he doesn’t like the other anymore.

It’s as basic a premise as one can think of for contemporary storytelling. And in his wondrous, wonderful, and exquisitely contained mini-opera “The Banshees of Inisherin,” writer-director Martin McDonagh takes this straightforward premise and sets it ablaze, using it as a backdrop to explore the conflict in man, the nature of pride and spite, the significance of companionship, and the curious edges of the male ego.

It’s a darkly comic drama that packs an emotional gut punch, after emotional gut punch and consistently finds new ways to deliver brutal body blows.

After portraying hitmen in McDonagh’s 2008 cult classic “In Bruges,” Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson reunited for the role of the men who are no longer friends when the film opens.

Like they do every day at 2:00 p.m., the unassuming Pádraic (Farrell) stops by Colm’s (Gleeson’s) beachside cottage to see if he wants to join him for a pint, at the local pub. But this time he’s snubbed by Colm. Later, he arrives, and Colm declines Pádraic’s offer to sit next to him. Pádraic, like the other patrons in the pub, is unable to comprehend just what is happening. The following day, Colm makes it very clear. He tells him, “I just don’t like you no more.” Did they have a drunken fight? Was it something he said? It’s not really that easy. Colm, who enjoys the arts and plays the fiddle. Has come to the realisation that Pádraic is boring. He’s sick of discussing the same issues, over and over. He just wants to be left alone.

Pádraic is gobsmacked to lose his closest friend, whilst Colm desperately seeks to leave some sort of musical legacy behind. Others like Siobhán (Kerry Condon) and Dominic (Barry Keoghan) are left to choose between picking up the pieces or looking out for themselves.

Condon and Keoghan absolutely shine in the film and steal every scene they’re in. Siobhán is easily the smartest person on the Island, confined by the attitudes of the era. Whilst Dominic is a deeply troubled character. Keoghan is a shoo-in for best supporting actor at the BAFTAs.

In lesser hands, Colm may seem unreasonable in his behaviour but Gleeson plays him with such world-weary depth, it’s impossible to dislike him. Farrell is also incredible as the bemused underdog, Pádraic.

It may not be as re-watchable as In Bruges, but The Banshees of Inisherin is a masterful exploration of the complications of male friendship.  Undoubtedly one of the best films of the year.

The Banshees of Inisherin is out in the UK on October 21st.

 

Doctor Who Am I

Matthew Jacobs wrote the screenplay of the film Doctor Who, starring Paul McGann in the title role. In the documentary film Doctor Who Am I, filmmaker Vanessa Yuille follows the British writer from his home in San Francisco into American Doctor Who fandom, particularly the conventions Gallifrey One and Long Island Doctor Who. Jacobs becomes our celebrity tour guide through this subculture but it’s signalled from the start that this is really his story, a personal journey that’s recalled and developed throughout the course of the film.

Drawn into the role of convention celebrity, we see Jacobs being rather flip with a fan early on as he sells an autograph from his table. We get the obligatory con-doc interviews with cosplayers, notably one identifying herself as a Time Fairy, with a lit-up dress and spinning orange scarves representing ‘regeneration energy’. She’s a great example of how fans wrap myth round themselves only to extend it with their own imagination. Art inspires art, and in response to the work he’s done, there’s been something waiting on account for Matthew Jacobs.

In writing the 1996 movie – which failed in its attempt to launch Paul McGann’s Doctor into a series – Jacobs confesses to “two fatal errors: we made him half human and we had him kiss.” Yet those two points have proved influential to The Doctor’s later relationships with Earth and its people. It seems more likely that beyond its poor TV scheduling, the show was just too weighed down by its own mythology to capture fresh imaginations. A good half hour is devoted to the star’s predecessor in the title role.

Matthew talks with former colleagues Paul McGann, leading lady Daphne Ashbrook and producer Philip Segal at conventions and in the workplace. Their own takes on Doctor Who and its fandom have developed over many years and it’s welcome input to a writer who for years actively avoided this world.

Perhaps not entirely fearlessly, Jacobs sits down with his critics in their memorabilia-strewn homes. Yet interest lies not in taking an old film to pieces but rather in what’s happening to Matthew Jacobs now. For each fan getting disappointment off their chest there are two recounting tales of delight and in one case even gratitude, from a fan who escaped into the ‘TV movie’ to survive great personal trauma. Soon Mr Jacobs begins to realise his journey through this documentary is fulfilling a similar role.

Trailer:

Doctor Who Am I is available now on DVD, Blu-Ray, digital and in cinemas. For details:

Episode 282: The unbearable weight of massive talent

Martyn and Gerrod bring you the latest in entertainment news, as well as a review of the new Nicolas Cage film, The unbearable weight of massive talent.

The podcast Smartlink.

Artwork by Beeble Pete. Adapted by Penny Smallshire.

Running Down Corridors can be found here.

We sound familiar can be found here, More than just an impression can be found here.

Comedians talking about football can be found here, Cister Act here.

Twitter: Martyn, Chris, Sam, Gerrod, Pete

Instagram: Podcast, Martyn, Chris, Sam

Episode 281: The Batman

Martyn and Gerrord are joined by Antoni Pearce. The dynamic trio talk about The Batman. Spoilers are contained within, obviously. 

The podcast Smartlink.

Artwork by Beeble Pete. Adapted by Penny Smallshire.

We sound familiar can be found here, More than just an impression can be found here.

Comedians talking about football can be found here, Cister Act here.

Twitter: Martyn, Chris, Sam, Gerrod, Pete

Instagram: Podcast, Martyn, Chris, Sam

 

Film review-The King’s Man

The King’s Man is a prequel, to the two previous films in the franchise. It attempts to provide a backstory to please Kingsman fans, but it primarily feels like it’s addressing questions nobody asked.

On the verge of World War One King George of England, Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, and Tsar Nicholas of Russia are three cousins who find themselves as rulers of three European and Eastern mega-powers (all played by Tom Hollander).
Meanwhile, dark forces commanded by Erik Jan Hanussen (Daniel Brühl) lurk in the shadows, attempting to infiltrate the three leaders’ trust and launch a world war, beginning with Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria’s assassination.
With his intimate relationship with Wilhem, Hanussen shatters the trust between cousins, while manipulative monk Grigori Rasputin (Rhys Ifans) rips into the Tsar, all while a secret mole runs rampant in King George’s circle of influence.

The action is directed incredibly well, there’s an absolutely breathtaking skydiving sequence and, Rhys Ifans steals every scene he’s in. However, the screenplay by director, Matthew Vaughn and Karl Gajdusek (The Last Days of American Crime) — adapted from Mark Millar’s comic —leads The King’s Man into being a very disjointed film. It’s a part-historical drama and part-action adventure. It starts with a serious anti-war message but quickly turns into a parody.

It’s difficult to pinpoint exactly where The King’s Man has gone wrong, but, despite a clever early twist, it all feels ploddingly predictable in a join-the-dots-of-history and Kingsman origin-tale kind of way, even the “shock” post-credits set-up for another instalment is rather head-slappingly obvious.

The King’s Man is out in the UK on Boxing Day.

 

Red Notice still Netflix’s number 1 worldwide

Despite the fact that “Red Notice” was not well received by critics, Netflix customers appear to be enamoured with the comedy-action film and its A-list ensemble, which includes Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Ryan Reynolds, and Gal Gadot.

The film topped Netflix’s weekly worldwide streaming lists for English-language movies in all 94 countries for the third week in a row.

According to Netflix, the film has received 328.8 million hours of viewing since its November 12 release and has now overtaken Sandra Bullock’s “Bird Box,” which garnered 282 million hours of viewing in its first 28 days.

Johnson took to Instagram to congratulate the creative team, on the positive response to the action-comedy adventure.

Director Rawson Marshall Thurber recently discussed the possibility of a sequel. He told The Hollywood reporter “I think that is a real possibility.”


Review-Venom: Let there be Carnage

The Venom franchise is a very strange beast and probably the oddest franchise in Sony’s Marvel Cinematic Universe-or whatever they’re calling it this week. The character was first seen in live-action, way back in 2007’s terrible Spider-man 3. Talks of a Venom spin-off followed the film, but nothing came of it until 2018.

The original Venom film was a letdown, a jumbled mess with an identity crisis. It wasn’t sure if it was a buddy-comedy or a body horror. It didn’t help matters that it was released in the same year as one of Hollywood’s most popular superhero movies, Avengers: Infinity War. Compared to that, Venom felt like a throwback to a superhero movie from 2003.

Venom: Let there be Carnage, however is heads and shoulders above the first film. The tone is set immediately and they stick with it. The crude humour is still present, but it somehow works this time around. At just 90 minutes, it’s a lean film that breezes by. Tom Hardy’s portrayal of Eddie Brock and the CGI Venom, gets the movie through some really tough spots.

Woody Harrelson, like Hardy, wholeheartedly embraces the film’s unique, frequently ridiculous tone and thoroughly enjoys his role as the antagonist. He’s practically chewing the scenery.
The duo makes it easier to overlook some of the obvious storey gaps and jumpy editing because they work so well together.

Whilst I enjoyed the pace of the film, the shorter runtime does do a huge disservice to Anne Weying (Michelle Williams), Francis Barrison (Naomie Harris), Stephen Graham and Patrick Mulligan, the films secondary characters. Fans of the comics may feel a bit letdown, by how little they feature. They all have intriguing potential roles, but they don’t get much in the way of development beyond a few rushed plot beats and end up being the story’s weakest link.

When the two alien symbiotes ultimately battle it out in the third act, it’s a satisfying conclusion.
The CGI is noticeably better than in the first film, probably due to director Andy Serkis’ previous experience.
The action is simple to follow and looks fantastic. There’s even a great cameo by Reece Shearsmith, which leads to the funniest line in the film.

While the film passes the fundamental prerequisites for a comic-book movie, enjoyment. It is the post-credit scene that elevates the film and the character of Venom to new heights. It not only broadens the realm of where he and Eddie Brock may appear next, but it also elevates the potential sequel to new heights.

Venom: Let there be carnage, is available to rent from all VOD services in the UK.

Episode 273: Last night in Soho/ Ghostbusters: Afterlife

It’s an original recipe special this week, as Martyn and Gerrod sit down to give spoiler-free reviews on Last night in Soho and, Ghostbusters: Afterlife.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to Spotify, Amazon Music, PodchaserPlayer FM, Stitcher, and Apple Podcasts.

We also have a Smartlink.

Artwork by Penny Smallshire.

We sound familiar can be found here.

More than just an impression can be found here.

Comedians talking about football can be found here.

Sam’s YouTube channel can be found here.

If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you. We also have a Ko-Fi.

Socials:

Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind

Pete – @BeeblePete

Sam-@SammyBoyMichael

Chris-@ChrisWalkerT

Instagram:

Podcast-@TheBWPodcast

Martyn-@BadWilf

Chris-@ChrisWalkerThomsonofficial

Sam-@SammyBoyMichael

TikTok

Martyn-@BadWilf

Chris-@ChrisWalkert

Trailer-Halloween Kills

Is he a man, or a manifestation of evil? Only one thing is certain, nothing can kill Michael Myers.

The horror antagonist, who started an entire genre is back and more deadly than ever in “Halloween Kills.”

This is the second instalment, in a new trilogy of Halloween films made by David Gordon Green.

Watch the newest trailer below.

In 2018, David Gordon Green’s Halloween, starring icon Jamie Lee Curtis, killed at the box office, earning more than $250 million worldwide, becoming the highest-grossing chapter in the four-decade franchise and setting a new record for the biggest opening weekend in history for a horror film starring a woman.

And the Halloween night when Michael Myers returned isn’t over yet.

Minutes after Laurie Strode (Curtis), her daughter Karen (Judy Greer) and granddaughter Allyson (Andi Matichak) left masked monster Michael Myers caged and burning in Laurie’s basement, Laurie is rushed to the hospital with life-threatening injuries, believing she finally killed her lifelong tormentor.

But when Michael manages to free himself from Laurie’s trap, his ritual bloodbath resumes. As Laurie fights her pain and prepares to defend herself against him, she inspires all of Haddonfield to rise up against their unstoppable monster.

The Strode women join a group of other survivors of Michael’s first rampage who decide to take matters into their own hands, forming a vigilante mob that sets out to hunt Michael down, once and for all.

Evil dies tonight.

Listen to our podcast about the original film here.