Attack the Block DVD review

In 2001 Joe Cornish was mugged, outside his house. He wondered what would have happened if an alien invasion had taken place, during the mugging. The kids he feared at that moment would have become useful. Their savagery would have become an asset. Ten years later, Attack The Block hit cinemas.

Joe, replaced himself with a female called, Sam (Jodie Whittaker). Sam is a well-spoken, recently graduated nurse. Who has just moved in to the Brixton tower block and one day, on her way home from work, she’s mugged by a gang of youths, then chased by aliens.
The leader of the gang, is fifteen-year-old, Moses (John Boyega), who decides to “tool up” and defend the block. The movie is incredibly fast-paced. We’re not really given a second to settle down, and think about what’s happening. The kids do start out, as the caricatures, the daily mail, write about. But they soon win us over you genuinely care about them by the end of the film. Joe Cornish has written and directed a nice little, gem of a movie.  This is a fun film it’s not a perfect film, the aliens are like something out of 80’s Doctor Who and the final scene, doesn’t quite have the ‘punch the air’ moment, it thinks it does. Maybe it’s because of my British cynicism, I wasn’t moved by the sight, of Moses, heroically swinging from a union flag. I imagine that’ll work better, in the inevitable US remake, where the 30-year-old, playing the teenager swoops in and saves the day, on the good old stars and stripes. This really is a fun, enjoyable movie. If Cornish’s next film, is as good as his debut, then I guarantee you, in ten years time, Joe Cornish will be a power-house in Hollywood.

 

DISC 1
JUNIOR COMMENTARY – Joe Cornish with John Boyega, Alex Esmail, Franz Drameh, Simon Howard and Leeon Jones
SENIOR COMMENTARY – Joe Cornish with Jodie Whittaker, Luke Treadaway and Nick Frost
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER COMMENTARY – Joe Cornish with Edgar Wright

DISC 2
Featurettes: Behind The Block, Creature Feature, Meet The Gang, Joe’s Massage, It’s A Rap, Unfilmed Action

Follow Bad Wilf on twitter @BadWilf

 

Price: £2.49

 

Episode 36: Dead of Night

Martyn, Gerrod and the now officially-announced third Bad Wilfer, Pete, look at Torchwood: Miracle Day – Dead of Night.

The podcast can be accessed via different places, including Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

Follow the Bad Wilf team:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod – @gerrod_edward

Also check out the official Bad Wilf Vlog.

Doctor Who: The BBC Radio Episodes

Here’s a beautiful box-set of BBC radio plays. So beautiful in fact, I almost didn’t open it.

It’s a collection of radio adventures; there are three different Doctors, the 3rd, 4th and 6th.

The Paradise of Death and The Ghosts of N-Space

These are 3rd Doctor stories which feature Jon Pertwee, Elizabeth Sladen and Nicholas Courtney.

Neither story really works that well and they introduce an extremely annoying, new companion.

In N-Space we meet the Brigadier’s uncle, in an awful ghost tale.
The performances are strong, but the scripts aren’t that great. You can make a bad audio out of a good script, but you can’t make a good audio out of a bad script. It does, however try to capture that era of Doctor Who, which even though it failed, was an interesting experiment and given the resent passing of Nicholas Courtney, it was great to hear him again

Doctor Who and the Pescatons

This is a fun little tale, which features the 4th Doctor and Sarah Jane. The Doctor and Sarah are battling monsters, that are bringing panic, to the streets of London. This is less than an audio play and more of an audio book, with Tom Baker narrating and Liz Sladen throwing in the odd comment. It’s a fun story, but I couldn’t help but feel that it would have suited Patrick Troughton’s 2nd Doctor better.

Exploration Earth

This is the real clunker in this box set. It features the 4th Doctor and Sarah Jane investigating the start, of life on Earth, only to run into the Megron Lord of Chaos. The performances feel a little “phoned in”.

Whatever Happened To… Susan?

This is a tongue-in-cheek tale of what Susan did after she left the TARDIS. Jane Asher takes over from Carol Anne Ford, as Susan and is talking to a documentary crew, about her life after leaving the TARDIS.

There are some laugh out loud moments here, including her tale about how The Doctor get’s younger and younger with each regeneration and how companions fell in love with him.

It’s an amusing story that runs at about 30 minutes, but it completely contradicts continuity. If you’re willing to switch your brain off and just listen, then you’ll have an amazing time, if you get bogged down with continuity, you won’t enjoy it.
I couldn’t help but wish that it was a proper, serious audio drama, with Carol Anne Ford reprising the role of Susan and telling the tale. Done seriously, this could have been a brilliant audio drama

Slipback

Now, this was the first Doctor Who story made for radio and was broadcast during the show’s enforced hiatus, in 1985.
This was a very Douglas Adams story – I could imagine Arthur Dent and Ford Prefect in this. This isn’t a great story; the computer is annoying, but likeable. The performances of Colin Baker and Nicola Bryant are quiet good and you get a foreshadow of the chemistry that would later work so well on Big Finish.

It’s a good enough box set with a few decent tales, but also with a few poor episodes. I’d say this is one for true, die hard Doctor Who fans. Viewers of the new series will get very little for money.

You can purchase this on CD or download from audiogo.co.uk

Torchwood-Department X. Review

Now, moving on to Department X, This finds the Torchwood team investigating the old Cardiff department store, GR Owen.
The team go undercover to determine why customers are disappearing.
It’s written by James Goss and Kai Owen is on vocal duty again. The style has changed for this audio, it’s no longer a first person narrative, it’s more like a regular audio book.

Now, this isn’t up to the high standard of the previous audio, Ghost Train, but it’s still extremely entertaining. Kai Owen does another brilliant reading, again capturing the essence of all the Torchwood team, as well as new characters, the musical stores and sound effects still work well.

This is a return to the Torchwood of yester-year, it feels like a series 2 story, not as dark as children of Earth, but not as fluffy as series 1.

I imagine it’s the last time the Ianto Jones features in any Torchwood spin-off, as future adventures are more likely to be based, between children of earth and the new US format, or on the US format

You can get this audiobook straight from Audiogo, on cd or download for under a tenner, which is a bargain really.

 

Review-Torchwood:Ghost Train

It’s been too long since our last instalment of any kind of, Torchwood. So this release was welcomed with open arms.
Ghost Train is written by James Goss.
Goss has already written a few novels for both Doctor Who and Torchwood, he wrote 2009’s Torchwood’s audio play, the Golden Age.

Ghost train is a first person narrative, Its set between Series 2 and Children of Earth.
It’s centred around Rhys Williams and so no other than, friend of the Bad Wilf podcast, Kai Owen is brought in to read it. No, I really am shameless enough to put in a plug, during a review.

Kai has a great voice for audio.
The reading is very clear, even while he is imitating the voices of the other characters. The sound effects and music work well and add real atmosphere but don’t distract from the speech.

The story starts out about missing fridges but then it gets complicated. It centres around a train pulling into a station late night/early morning, years after the track has been abandoned. For the 2 weeks previous many strange things have been happening. Radios telling people to kill.
SatNav’s telling drivers to run people over. And it all has something to do with that train. The train is coming from a world that has just recently been destroyed and now what’s coming from that world, is coming to this one.

I absolutely loved this story, Its a 2 CD set, at just under 2 hours and 20 minutes. Honestly, it could have done with being slightly longer.
It’s funny when it has to be funny, it’s gripping when it needs to grip and it doesn’t feel like 2hrs and 20mins.
Kai manages to capture the essence of every character, extremely well, especially Ianto, he nail’s Gareth David-Lyod’s dry wit, and speech perfectly. He captures Gwen and Jack pretty well too.

Like the previous Doctor Who Audiobook it is also split into chapters for ease. It also contains the £5 off your first purchase code. Like all other Torchwood Audiobooks, this should be considered canon.

You can get this audiobook straight from Audiogo, on cd or download for under a tenner, which is a bargain really.

Episode 14: Sarah Jane Series Four

A Sarah Jane filled episode in which Martyn looks at the vault of secrets, then Martyn and Gerrod look at Death of The Doctor.

Due to technobumble the review for The Empty Planet went missing, so we skip straight to Martyn and David Montieth from Geek Syndicate talking about Lost in Time.

Geek Syndicate: geeksyndicate.blogspot.com

 

(we have a new explicit tag! Dont worry, we don’t overly swear, we’re still good boys … ish)

Episode 12: The Wilfs of Fenric

Martyn and Gerrod discuss The Curse of Fenric, The Star Wars 3D re-release and much, much more.

They also check out Him & Her, Get Him to the Greek and Sesame Street: True Mud.

 

Episode 11: Human Nature

In which Martyn and Gerrod stay the most on topic they have ever been and discuss Doctor Who: Human Nature.

 

The podcast can be accessed via different places, including Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

Follow the Bad Wilf team on Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod – @gerrod_edward

Also check out the official Bad Wilf Vlog.

 

 

Episode 4: Bad Wilf Harder

Martyn and Gerrod are joined by a guest host, Glen.

Jack Daniels is sunk, Blink and Rose are discussed and THE Colin Baker is plugged.

Doctor Who audio review: The Sirens of Time

In practice, the story’s shape gets in the way. Gallifrey is in a state of crisis, facing destruction at the hands of an overwhelming enemy. And the Doctor is involved in three different incarnations – each caught up in a deadly adventure, scattered across time and space. The web of time is threatened – and someone wants the Doctor dead. The three incarnations of the Doctor must join together to set time back on the right track – but in doing so, will they unleash a still greater threat? (synopsis)

In The Sirens of Time, fan service is performed to a five-star degree. In the first moment of Part One, a Gallifreyan tannoy voice delivers an alert in accurate, Deadly Assassin style. The meeting of the Doctors’ minds later on is a good mix of the sound heard in The Three Doctors and something better suited to accompany the memory flashbacks that the three share.

Each of the three Doctors get an episode to themselves then converge in the conclusion. In practice, this story structure is a bit disorienting. The three short pieces don’t get much time to develop before the fourth on Gallifrey gets into gear. Although the plot seems to have no holes it doesn’t come together in the way I imagine the makers hoped.

Doctor Who is usually better for me in reruns and this was no exception. Doubtless most of the actors will have completely forgotten having done this job but that’s fine with me; they’ve left behind some good performances. I hope they had some laughs and maybe earned a penny or two because my side of the equation’s worked out pretty well.

Check out the trailer.