Eccleston explains why he left Doctor Who

In an acting master class at the Theatre Royal Haymarket, Christopher Eccleston was asked why he left a such a high paid job as Doctor Who. He responded:

“I left Doctor Who because I could not get along with the senior people. I left because of politics. I did not see eye-to-eye with them. I didn’t agree with the way things were being run. I didn’t like the culture that had grown up, around the series. So I left, I felt, over a principle.

“I thought to remain, which would have made me a lot of money and given me huge visibility, the price I would have had to pay was to eat a lot of shit. I’m not being funny about that. I didn’t want to do that and it comes to the art of it, in a way. I feel that if you run your career and– we are vulnerable as actors and we are constantly humiliating ourselves auditioning. But if you allow that to go on, on a grand scale you will lose whatever it is about you and it will be present in your work.

“If you allow your desire to be successful and visible and financially secure – if you allow that to make you throw shades on your parents, on your upbringing, then you’re knackered. You’ve got to keep something back, for yourself, because it’ll be present in your work.  A purity or an idealism is essential or you’ll become– you’ve got to have standards, no matter how hard work that is. So it makes it a hard road, really.

“You know, it’s easy to find a job when you’ve got no morals, you’ve got nothing to be compromised, you can go, ‘Yeah, yeah. That doesn’t matter. That director can bully that prop man and I won’t say anything about it’. But then when that director comes to you and says ‘I think you should play it like this’ you’ve surely got to go ‘How can I respect you, when you behave like that?’

“So, that’s why I left. My face didn’t fit and I’m sure they were glad to see the back of me. The important thing is that I succeeded. It was a great part. I loved playing him. I loved connecting with that audience. Because I’ve always acted for adults and then suddenly you’re acting for children, who are far more tasteful; they will not be bullshitted. It’s either good, or it’s bad. They don’t schmooze at after-show parties, with cocktails.”

B.W reporter Martyn

Hand of fear viewing figures

BBC4’s showing of Doctor Who: The Hand of Fear, had 203,000 watching part one, with 276,000 watching part two, according to the overnight figures..

Episode Three, had 168,000 watching, with the audience soaring to 294,000 for part four.

The show, was broadcast as a tribute to Elisabeth Sladen, who sadly passed away last month.

Unfortunately the episodes are not available on the iPlayer due to copyright issues.

A facebook campaign, attempting to get BBC4 to repeat more classic Doctor Who, was joined by over 600 people, within a few hours of episode four airing. You can join the facebook page here:

http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Get-BBC-Four-to-show-More-Classic-Doctor-Who/172723179447746

Matt Smith’s BAFTA nomination

Matt Smith has been nominated for his first BAFTA, for his portrayal as The Doctor.
He is nominated for best leading actor.
His competition are, Jim Broadbent, for Any Human Heart. Benedict Cumberbatch, for Sherlock, and Daniel Rigby, for Eric and Ernie.

Episode 24: One Tun of Fun

Martyn and Gerroed attended a Doctor Who Series Six launch party at the One Tun Pub in Farringdon and Pete gives us his review of the Inferno audiobook.

The recording includes a rant from El Presdente, Adam Purcell from staggering stories: staggeringstories.net

We also talk to:
The guys from the Pharos Project: thepharosproject.libsyn.com
Professor Dave, from Professor Dave’s Ark in Space: profdave.libsyn.com
Tony Gallichan from the Flashing Blade and DWO Whocast
theflashingbladepodcast.net
drwho-online.co.uk
and Rob Hughes, the designer of our logo, whom we still owe a drink.

Pictures from the event:

Toby Hadoke and Martyn
Wyn from That 1963 Show
logo designer Rob Hughes
Gerrod, sidled up to the bar

 

Brokeback podcasting

 

 

Tom Baker’s tribute to Lis Sladen

Sarah Jane dead? No, impossible! Impossible. Only last week I agreed to do six new audio adventures with her for Big Finish Productions. She can’t be dead. But she is: she died yesterday morning. Cancer. I had no idea she was ill; she was so private, never wanted any fuss, and now, gone. A terrible blow to her friends and a shattering blow for all those fans of the programme whose lives were touched every Saturday evening by her lovely heroic character, Sarah-Jane Smith. … Those sweet memories of happy days with Lis Sladen, the lovely, witty, kind and so talented Lis Sladen. I am consoled by the memories. I was there, I knew her, she was good to me and I shall always be grateful, and I shall miss her.

Ayesha Antoine

Between acts at Stratford East, Martyn and Gerrod interview Ayesha Antoine; safe to say a great time was had by all. Look out for Martyn and Gerrod in Ayesha’s next film, a kick-ass kung-fu spy movie.

Ayesha played the scientist Dee Dee Blasco in Doctor Who: Midnight.

Red Riding Hood at Stratford East: stratfordeast.com

Follow Ayesha on Twitter: @AyeshaAntoine

 

Episode 12: The Wilfs of Fenric

Martyn and Gerrod discuss The Curse of Fenric, The Star Wars 3D re-release and much, much more.

They also check out Him & Her, Get Him to the Greek and Sesame Street: True Mud.

 

Episode 11: Human Nature

In which Martyn and Gerrod stay the most on topic they have ever been and discuss Doctor Who: Human Nature.

 

The podcast can be accessed via different places, including Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

Follow the Bad Wilf team on Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod – @gerrod_edward

Also check out the official Bad Wilf Vlog.