Episode 45: Entertainment Media Show

Martyn, Pete from Bad Wilf and Chris from the Pharos Project talk to:

  • David Prowse (Star Wars, Hitchhiker’s, Tomorrow People)
  • Eve Myles (Torchwood)
  • Arthur Darvill (11th Doctor companion ‘Rory Williams’)
  • Paul McGann (8th Doctor)

EMS: collectormanialondon.com

The Pharos Project: thepharosproject.libsyn.com
@pharosproject on Twitter

More pictures – most are courtesy of Tim Drury (Tim’s Flickr)

Dr Who talk
Dr Who talk
Barber, Moffett, Blackwood
Cosplayers
Cyberman
Martyn & Cyberman
Angel & Silcence
Angel & Silence
Future Amy
TARDIS headgear
TARDIS dress
Peg Doll
David Tennant
With Paul McGann
Classic Who talk
Kate O’Mara
Classic Who talk

Episode 44: The Girl Who Waited

Martyn’s attempted retirement fails. Vodka is drunk and reaction is given to Doctor Who: The Girl Who Waited and the new Fantom Films radio comedy, Fight For The Remote.

Fight for the Remote: fantomfilms.co.uk

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as;

Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

Follow the Bad Wilf team:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod – @ingerrodsmind

Check out the Bad Wilf Vlog.

Review – The Girl Who Waited

The Girl Who Waited heralds something we haven’t seen in a while-three episodes in a row that are good. Let’s think about that – the past three episodes have all been good.

First, it’s written by Tom MacRae, who himself is an impressive man. At just 23 he had his own show, Sky One’s Mile High. In the eight years since his career has gone from strength to strength. He is a true talent powerhouse. MacRae has previously written for Doctor Who before: he wrote the Cyberman two-parter for series 2.

This episode is Doctor Who at its best and, if any episode challenges Neil Gaiman’s The Doctor’s Wife to a Hugo award, it’ll be this one. This is an intelligent adventure, one most definitely one for the adults.
It’s timey wimey and deals with parallel time streams. The Doctor and Rory are stuck in one time stream, Amy in another, which happens to run faster. A few minutes for Rory and The Doctor is a week for Amy.

The episode deals with paradoxes and moral dilemmas caused by paradoxes. The Doctor forces Rory to make a brutal decision. We see even more how Rory’s character has developed. We see him really angry at the Doctor for letting something like this happen. He even challenges the Doctor with the line “You’re turning me, into you.”  Every member of the cast puts in a magnificent performance, but this is Karen Gillan’s episode. Here, we see her really flex her acting muscle and she does it well. She plays the older version of Amy incredibly well. She only adds the most subtle of stiffness to her joints. Never over playing it, she’s just subtly slower. She even deepens her voice, slightly for the older Amy.

The scene where the older and younger Amy are discussing their love for Rory, is truly moving.

We also get insight into the darker side of the Doctor and we’re shown the risks and danger involved in travelling with him. Personally, I think Smith, like McCoy before him is best, when he plays the cold, calculating, manipulative Doctor. People thought Smith should be worried following Tennant. No, the actor following Smith is the one who should worry.

The dynamic between the TARDIS crew is going to be permanently altered after this episode. Although Amy will never know what her other self went through, Rory has been deeply affected by the future Amy that he met. He met a more cynical, hate filled Amy who spent 36 years alone: 36 years of cold, hard reality. Her Doctor didn’t save her. The truth is that the Doctor cannot save everyone and some of his friends die in the course of their adventures with him and Amy did die in this episode, just the younger one survived.

This episode was a vibrant-a visual delight. The look of the centre re-asserted the idea that in the future everything will be sterilised, clean and white.

In many ways, The Girl Who Waited is the budget episode. It features very few guest stars and mostly focuses on the principal cast and it’s spectacular for it. Murray Gold has done it again; his musical score manages to tug at the heart strings a little bit more. This episode deserves all the high praise it receives. Let’s just hope that next week’s episode, The God Complex, can make the good episode run four-for-four.

Listen to our podcast review here.

Episode 42: Let’s Kill Hitler

Martyn, Gerrod and Pete look at Doctor Who: Let’s Kill Hitler.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as;

Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

Follow the Bad Wilf team:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod – @ingerrodsmind

Check out the Bad Wilf Vlog.

Episode 41: The War Games

Martyn and The Pharos Project look for Ryan Reynolds, then Martyn and Gerrod subject themselves to The War Games.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as;

Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

Follow the Bad Wilf team:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod – @ingerrodsmind

Check out the Bad Wilf Vlog.

Eccleston explains why he left Doctor Who

In an acting master class at the Theatre Royal Haymarket, Christopher Eccleston was asked why he left a such a high paid job as Doctor Who. He responded:

“I left Doctor Who because I could not get along with the senior people. I left because of politics. I did not see eye-to-eye with them. I didn’t agree with the way things were being run. I didn’t like the culture that had grown up, around the series. So I left, I felt, over a principle.

“I thought to remain, which would have made me a lot of money and given me huge visibility, the price I would have had to pay was to eat a lot of shit. I’m not being funny about that. I didn’t want to do that and it comes to the art of it, in a way. I feel that if you run your career and– we are vulnerable as actors and we are constantly humiliating ourselves auditioning. But if you allow that to go on, on a grand scale you will lose whatever it is about you and it will be present in your work.

“If you allow your desire to be successful and visible and financially secure – if you allow that to make you throw shades on your parents, on your upbringing, then you’re knackered. You’ve got to keep something back, for yourself, because it’ll be present in your work.  A purity or an idealism is essential or you’ll become– you’ve got to have standards, no matter how hard work that is. So it makes it a hard road, really.

“You know, it’s easy to find a job when you’ve got no morals, you’ve got nothing to be compromised, you can go, ‘Yeah, yeah. That doesn’t matter. That director can bully that prop man and I won’t say anything about it’. But then when that director comes to you and says ‘I think you should play it like this’ you’ve surely got to go ‘How can I respect you, when you behave like that?’

“So, that’s why I left. My face didn’t fit and I’m sure they were glad to see the back of me. The important thing is that I succeeded. It was a great part. I loved playing him. I loved connecting with that audience. Because I’ve always acted for adults and then suddenly you’re acting for children, who are far more tasteful; they will not be bullshitted. It’s either good, or it’s bad. They don’t schmooze at after-show parties, with cocktails.”

Episode 31: A Good Man Goes to War

Martyn and Gerrod look at A Good Man Goes To War and review the Third Doctor anime, that is currently on YouTube.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as;

Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

Follow the Bad Wilf team:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod – @ingerrodsmind

Check out the Bad Wilf Vlog.

Episode 30: The Almost People

Martyn and Gerrod look at The Almost People. Pete reviews the Eleventh Doctor audiobook The Ring of Steel.

The podcast can be accessed via different places, including Audioboom, Player fm and Itunes.

Follow the Bad Wilf team:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Pete – @BeeblePete

Gerrod – @gerrod_edward

Also check out the official Bad Wilf Vlog.

Episode 28: The Doctor’s Wife

In episode 28, we discuss ‘The Doctor’s Wife’ written by legendary author, Neil Gaiman.

The Doctor’s Wife” is the fourth episode of the sixth series of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was broadcast on 14 May 2011 in the United Kingdom, and later the same day in the United States. It was written by Neil Gaiman and directed by Richard Clark.

In the episode, an entity called the House (voiced by Michael Sheen) tricks the alien time traveler the Doctor (Matt Smith) and his companions Amy Pond (Karen Gillan) and Rory Williams (Arthur Darvill) into being lured to the asteroid the House resides outside the universe by sending a distress call to the Doctor’s time machine and spaceship the TARDIS. The House removes the matrix of the TARDIS and places it in the body of a woman named Idris (Suranne Jones), who proceeds to help the Doctor prevent House from escaping its pocket universe with the TARDIS.

“The Doctor’s Wife” was originally intended to be produced as part of the previous series, but was pushed back due to budget constraints. Gaiman revised the script many times, having to add and remove characters and events as production saw fit. The episode was filmed in the autumn of 2010 and featured a makeshift TARDIS control room which was the design from a winner of a contest on the children’s programme Blue Peter. The episode was seen by 7.97 million viewers in the UK and was met with positive reviews from critics, with praise for Jones’s performance. The episode won the 2011 Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation and the 2012 Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to;

Podchaser, Player FM, Stitcher and Apple Podcasts.

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Twitter:

Martyn – @BadWilf

Gerrod –@InGerrodsMind