An Evening With Eve Myles

Eve Myles returns to the Bad Wilf Podcast! Martyn is joined by Paul and Chris from The Pharos Project and they have a sit down by an open fire for an EVEning with.

Have some links:
SFX Weekender: sfxweekender.com
The Pharos Project: thepharosproject.libsyn.com
@pharosproject on Twitter

The show can be accessed via different places, including Miro, Stiticher, Blubrry and Itunes.

Follow Eve on twitter

Episode 54: DW Experience Revisited

Martyn is joined by his 3-year old son and they discuss their trip to the Doctor Who Experience.

The attraction will remain in London until 22nd February 2012 before moving to its permanent home in Cardiff, Wales.

Details: doctorwhoexperience.com

Continue reading Episode 54: DW Experience Revisited

Episode 52: Christmas and K-9

In which your heroes look at The Doctor, The Widow and The Wardrobe plus the Aussie K-9.

K-9 on Channel 5: channel5.com/shows/k9
Build your own papercraft K-9 at k9official.com

Continue reading Episode 52: Christmas and K-9

Episode 45: Entertainment Media Show

Martyn, Pete from Bad Wilf and Chris from the Pharos Project talk to:

  • David Prowse (Star Wars, Hitchhiker’s, Tomorrow People)
  • Eve Myles (Torchwood)
  • Arthur Darvill (11th Doctor companion ‘Rory Williams’)
  • Paul McGann (8th Doctor)

EMS: collectormanialondon.com

The Pharos Project: thepharosproject.libsyn.com
@pharosproject on Twitter

More pictures – most are courtesy of Tim Drury (Tim’s Flickr)

Dr Who talk
Dr Who talk
Barber, Moffett, Blackwood
Cosplayers
Cyberman
Martyn & Cyberman
Angel & Silcence
Angel & Silence
Future Amy
TARDIS headgear
TARDIS dress
Peg Doll
David Tennant
With Paul McGann
Classic Who talk
Kate O’Mara
Classic Who talk

Eccleston explains why he left Doctor Who

In an acting master class at the Theatre Royal Haymarket, Christopher Eccleston was asked why he left a such a high paid job as Doctor Who. He responded:

“I left Doctor Who because I could not get along with the senior people. I left because of politics. I did not see eye-to-eye with them. I didn’t agree with the way things were being run. I didn’t like the culture that had grown up, around the series. So I left, I felt, over a principle.

“I thought to remain, which would have made me a lot of money and given me huge visibility, the price I would have had to pay was to eat a lot of shit. I’m not being funny about that. I didn’t want to do that and it comes to the art of it, in a way. I feel that if you run your career and– we are vulnerable as actors and we are constantly humiliating ourselves auditioning. But if you allow that to go on, on a grand scale you will lose whatever it is about you and it will be present in your work.

“If you allow your desire to be successful and visible and financially secure – if you allow that to make you throw shades on your parents, on your upbringing, then you’re knackered. You’ve got to keep something back, for yourself, because it’ll be present in your work.  A purity or an idealism is essential or you’ll become– you’ve got to have standards, no matter how hard work that is. So it makes it a hard road, really.

“You know, it’s easy to find a job when you’ve got no morals, you’ve got nothing to be compromised, you can go, ‘Yeah, yeah. That doesn’t matter. That director can bully that prop man and I won’t say anything about it’. But then when that director comes to you and says ‘I think you should play it like this’ you’ve surely got to go ‘How can I respect you, when you behave like that?’

“So, that’s why I left. My face didn’t fit and I’m sure they were glad to see the back of me. The important thing is that I succeeded. It was a great part. I loved playing him. I loved connecting with that audience. Because I’ve always acted for adults and then suddenly you’re acting for children, who are far more tasteful; they will not be bullshitted. It’s either good, or it’s bad. They don’t schmooze at after-show parties, with cocktails.”

B.W reporter Martyn

Hand of fear viewing figures

BBC4’s showing of Doctor Who: The Hand of Fear, had 203,000 watching part one, with 276,000 watching part two, according to the overnight figures..

Episode Three, had 168,000 watching, with the audience soaring to 294,000 for part four.

The show, was broadcast as a tribute to Elisabeth Sladen, who sadly passed away last month.

Unfortunately the episodes are not available on the iPlayer due to copyright issues.

A facebook campaign, attempting to get BBC4 to repeat more classic Doctor Who, was joined by over 600 people, within a few hours of episode four airing. You can join the facebook page here:

http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Get-BBC-Four-to-show-More-Classic-Doctor-Who/172723179447746