Review-Doctor Who: The Gemini Contagion

Now, only a week before the 2011 series of Doctor Who kicks off, the last Time Lord returns with this audiobook, read by Meera Syal, she played Nasreen Chaudry in the Silurians two-parter, from series 5.

Meera Syal gives us an excellent read, she manages to capture the essence of every character

It’s a very Douglas Adams story. I could imagine him writing this if he were still with us. The story focuses on a new anti-viral handwash Gemini, which has been laced with Meme-Spawn, a sentient microorganism which makes the user fluent in every universal language. Now, you may be thinking. Brilliant, how do I get some?

Unfortunately, the manufacturers didn’t think to test it on humans. Humans react badly to, Gemini –It makes them speak every language at once, with a violent urge to communicate. In come the Doctor and Amy, they land on an Earth-bound cargo-ship loaded with Gemini and with the crew already infected by the virus. Unable to escape the ship, and with Amy facing infection, the Doctor is faced with a conundrum: does he save Amy or the Earth?

The quality of this audio really impressed me. I started to wish that it was an episode of the tv series and not just an audio. It’s a gripping story, but there is one niggle. I don’t believe that the owner of the company, wouldn’t have tested It on human’s, before selling it to them. But, that is just a minor niggle.
Everything else about this story is enjoyable and, it’s under a tenner, which is cheap for a quick who-fix.

You can get this audiobook straight from Audiogo, on cd or download for under a tenner.


Review-Torchwood:Ghost Train

It’s been too long since our last instalment of any kind of, Torchwood. So this release was welcomed with open arms.

Ghost Train is written by James Goss.
Goss has already written a few novels for both Doctor Who and Torchwood, he wrote 2009’s Torchwood’s audio play, the Golden Age.

Ghost train is a first-person narrative, It’s set between Series 2 and Children of Earth.
It’s centred around Rhys Williams so Kai Owen reads this story.

Kai has a great voice for audio.
The reading is very clear, even while he is imitating the voices of the other characters. The sound effects and music work well and add real atmosphere but don’t distract from the speech.

The story starts out about missing fridges but then it gets complicated. It centres around a train pulling into a station late night/early morning, years after the track has been abandoned. For the 2 weeks, previous many strange things have been happening. Radios telling people to kill.
SatNav’s telling drivers to run people over. And it all has something to do with that train. The train is coming from a world that has just recently been destroyed and now what’s coming from that world, is coming to this one.

I absolutely loved this story, Its a 2 CD set, at just under 2 hours and 20 minutes. Honestly, it could have done with being slightly longer.
It’s funny when it has to be funny, it’s gripping when it needs to grip and it doesn’t feel like 2hrs and 20mins.
Kai manages to capture the essence of every character, extremely well, especially Ianto, he nails Gareth David-Lyod’s dry wit, and speech perfectly. He captures Gwen and Jack pretty well too.

Like the previous Doctor Who Audiobook, it is also split into chapters for ease. It also contains the £5 off your first purchase code. Like all other Torchwood Audiobooks, this should be considered canon.

Episode 14: Sarah Jane Series Four

A Sarah Jane filled episode in which Martyn looks at the vault of secrets, then Martyn and Gerrod look at Death of The Doctor.

Martyn and David Montieth from Geek Syndicate talking about Lost in Time.

The Sarah Jane Adventures is a British science-fiction television programme, that was produced by BBC Cymru Wales for CBBC, created by Russell T Davies starring Elisabeth Sladen. The programme is a spin-off of the long-running BBC science fiction programme Doctor Who and is aimed at a younger audience than Doctor Who. It focuses on the adventures of Sarah Jane Smith, an investigative journalist who, as a young woman, had numerous adventures across time and space.



The series debuted on BBC One with a 60-minute special, “Invasion of the Bane”, on 1 January 2007, and broadcast through till 2011, up until Sladen’s death. It was nominated for a British Academy Children’s Award in 2008 in the Drama category, and for a BAFTA Cymru in 2009 in the Children’s Drama category.[1][2] The programme won a Royal Television Society 2010 award for Best Children’s Drama

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(we have a new explicit tag! Don’t worry, we don’t overly swear, we’re still good boys … ish)

Episode 12: The Wilfs of Fenric

In episode 12 of the podcast, we discuss The Doctor Who: The Curse of Fenric, The Star Wars 3D re-releases and much, much more.

They also check out Him & Her, Get Him to the Greek and, Sesame Street: True Mud.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to;

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Episode 11: Human Nature

In episode 11,  Gerrod and I stay the most on-topic we have ever been. We discuss Doctor Who: Human Nature.

Human Nature” is the eighth episode of the third series of the revived British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was originally broadcast on BBC One on 26 May 2007. It is the first episode of a two-part story written by Paul Cornell adapted from his 1995 Doctor Who novel Human Nature. Its second part, “The Family of Blood”, aired on 2 June. Along with “The Family of Blood”, it was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form in 2008.[1]

In the episode, the alien time traveler the Tenth Doctor (David Tennant) hides from his pursuers, the Family of Blood, in 1913 England. He transforms himself into a human and implants the false persona of a schoolteacher called “John Smith” to avoid detection until the Family’s life runs out.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to;

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If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

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Episode 10: Hulk Boobs

Martyn and Gerrod discuss Sherlock, Doctor Who: The Lodger, a pair of Hulk boobs and the recent interview with Torchwood’s Kai Owen. They also get Glen’s view on Doctor Who.

The Lodger” is the eleventh episode of the fifth series of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, first broadcast on BBC One on 12 June 2010. It was written by Gareth Roberts, who based the story on his 2006 Doctor Who Magazine comic strip “The Lodger”.

The episode features the Doctor (Matt Smith) stranded on Earth and separated from his companion Amy Pond (Karen Gillan), when an unknown force prevents his time-travelling spaceship, the TARDIS, from landing. To investigate, he moves into the flat of Craig Owens (James Corden) and attempts to fit in with ordinary humans while unknowingly playing matchmaker for Craig and his good friend Sophie (Daisy Haggard).



The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to Amazon Music, PodchaserPlayer FM, Stitcher, and Apple Podcasts.

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If you’d like to support the show, then please shop via our Amazon link. A small percentage goes our way, at no extra cost to you.

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Episode 06: The Vampires of Venice

In episode 6, Gerrod and I discuss ‘The Vampires of Venice’, ‘Amy’s Choice’.

The Vampires of Venice” is the sixth episode of the fifth series of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was broadcast on 8 May 2010 on BBC One. It was written by Toby Whithouse, who previously wrote “School Reunion”, and was directed by the first-time Doctor Who director Jonny Campbell.

Following from the end of “Flesh and Stone” where his companion Amy Pond (Karen Gillan) had kissed him, the alien time traveler the Eleventh Doctor (Matt Smith) picks up Amy’s fiancé Rory (Arthur Darvill) and takes the two on a romantic trip to Venice in 1580. There they are intrigued by a girls’ school whose students appear to be vampires and discover that they are really alien refugees in disguise, who plot to make Venice their new home.

Amy’s Choice” is the seventh episode of the fifth series of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It first broadcast on BBC One on 15 May 2010. It was written by sitcom writer Simon Nye and directed by Catherine Morshead.

In the episode, the Eleventh Doctor, a time-traveling alien played by Matt Smith, and his human traveling companions Amy (Karen Gillan) and Rory (Arthur Darvill), are in a trap set by the mysterious “Dream Lord” (Toby Jones), wherein they repeatedly fall asleep and wake up in a different reality. In one, Amy and Rory are happily married but pursued by elderly people possessed by aliens, while in another they are on board the Doctor’s time machine, the TARDIS, where they anticipate being frozen to death by a nearby astronomical phenomenon. They must decide which is the real reality and die in the dream, to wake up in reality and escape the trap. At the episode’s conclusion, the Dream Lord is ultimately revealed to be a manifestation of the Doctor’s dark side and self-loathing.

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Episode 04: Bad Wilf Harder

In this episode, Gerrod and I are joined by our good friend Glen. Glen has never seen Doctor Who, so we showed him, Rose and Blink.

Rose” is the opening episode of the first series of the revived British science fiction television program Doctor Who. The episode was directed by Keith Boak and written by Russell T Davies who was also one of the three executive producers. It was originally broadcast in the UK on BBC One on 26 March 2005. “Rose” was the first Doctor Who episode to air since the Doctor Who television film in 1996.

In the episode, the London department store worker Rose Tyler (Billie Piper) gets caught in the middle of the alien time traveller the Doctor’s (Christopher Eccleston) plot to prevent an invasion of the Earth by the Nestene Consciousness (voiced by Nicholas Briggs) and the Autons after the Doctor destroys Rose’s workplace.

Blink” is the tenth episode of the third series of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It was originally broadcast on 9 June 2007 on BBC One. The episode was directed by Hettie MacDonald and is the only episode in the 2007 series written by Steven Moffat. The episode is based on a previous short story written by Moffat for the 2006 Doctor Who Annual, entitled “‘What I Did on My Christmas Holidays’ By Sally Sparrow”.

In the episode, the Tenth Doctor—a time-travelling alien played by David Tennant—is trapped in 1969 and tries to communicate with a young woman in 2007, Sally Sparrow (Carey Mulligan), to prevent the statue-like Weeping Angels from taking control of the TARDIS. Sparrow and her best friend’s brother, Larry Nightingale (Finlay Robertson), must unravel a set of cryptic clues sent through time by the marooned Doctor, left in DVD Easter eggs.

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Episode 03: The Three Doctors

In episode 3, we speak about ‘The Three Doctors’ but Skype traps Gerrod in a time eddy and Martyn has to go solo.

The Three Doctors is the first serial of the tenth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 30 December 1972 to 20 January 1973.

In the serial, the solar engineer Omega (Stephen Thorne), the creator of the experiments that allowed the Time Lords to travel in time, seeks revenge on the Time Lords after he was left for dead in a universe made of antimatter. The Time Lords recruit the time travelers the First Doctor (William Hartnell), the Second Doctor (Patrick Troughton), and the Third Doctor (Jon Pertwee) for help when Omega drains their civilisation’s power.

The serial opened the tenth anniversary year of the series and features the first three Doctors all appearing in the same serial. This makes it the first Doctor Who story in which an earlier incarnation of the Doctor returns to the show.

The podcast is available from all good podcast services, such as but not limited to Amazon Music, PodchaserPlayer FM, Stitcher, and Apple Podcasts.

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Doctor Who audio review: The Sirens of Time

In practice, the story’s shape gets in the way. Gallifrey is in a state of crisis, facing destruction at the hands of an overwhelming enemy. And the Doctor is involved in three different incarnations – each caught up in a deadly adventure, scattered across time and space. The web of time is threatened – and someone wants the Doctor dead. The three incarnations of the Doctor must join together to set time back on the right track – but in doing so, will they unleash a still greater threat? (synopsis)

In The Sirens of Time, fan service is performed to a five-star degree. In the first moment of Part One, a Gallifreyan tannoy voice delivers an alert in accurate, Deadly Assassin style. The meeting of the Doctors’ minds later on is a good mix of the sound heard in The Three Doctors and something better suited to accompany the memory flashbacks that the three share.

Each of the three Doctors get an episode to themselves then converge in the conclusion. In practice, this story structure is a bit disorienting. The three short pieces don’t get much time to develop before the fourth on Gallifrey gets into gear. Although the plot seems to have no holes it doesn’t come together in the way I imagine the makers hoped.

Doctor Who is usually better for me in reruns and this was no exception. Doubtless most of the actors will have completely forgotten having done this job but that’s fine with me; they’ve left behind some good performances. I hope they had some laughs and maybe earned a penny or two because my side of the equation’s worked out pretty well.

Check out the trailer.

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