Episode 82:Sweeney Dredd

In which Martyn gets drunk and he and Gerrod discuss the 2012 films, The Sweeney and Dredd.

This is a raw, unedited discussion by two drunk people. Enjoy. Play along at home, by listening out for Gerrod’s ghost and our secret word ‘mouse’.

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Being Human spoiler free review

“Fill a bowl with boiling water and washing up liquid, this is a two sets of Marigold problem”.

Being Human returns at the end of the week and gets off to a flying startBeing Human series 5. Tom, Hal and Alex (Michael Socha, Damien Molony and Kate Bracken) return as our supernatural trio. The story picks up a few weeks after the events of series 4. Tom and Hal are still grieving for Eve and Annie isn’t mentioned, which is a very smart move. Series 5 is about as distant as we could get from the original show and, that’s no bad thing.
Michael Socha and Damien Malony reprise their roles effortlessly. Hal and Tom have managed to inject the humour that vanished in the later part of George and Mitchell’s tenure. Kate Bracken is brilliant as Alex and is a million miles away from Annie.

This is a great first episode and will no doubt win over any George and Mitchell fan-girls, or general naysayers that felt Being Human had lost its spark. I’m going to call it now, a sixth series is a given.

Being Human returns to BBC Three, February 3rd at 10pm

Episode 81:Django Unchained

In which Martyn and Gerrod take a look at the highly anticipated new Tarantino django-unchained04film, Django unchained.

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DVD REVIEW-The Sweeney

What you lookin’ at, slag?

In 2007, Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg brought us Hot Fuzz. Hot Fuzz was the answer to the question ‘why doesn’t Britain make big, over the top cop movies’. Everybody involved in this, has clearly never seen Hot Fuzz.
Now, it’s not that the sweeney is a bad film, it really isn’t. It just isn’t the Sweeney. It’s directed by the uber-talented Nick Love. the problem is, Love seems to think he is directing the next big classic. But, this isn’t Heat, and Winstone and Plan B aren’t DeNiro and Paccino. However, Ray Winstone is well cast as Reagan and puts in one of his best performances in recent years. But, Plan B just comes across as a poor man’s Tom Hardy. He mumbles his lines and tries to come across as sinister, but just comes across as miscast. The film doesn’t quite know if it wants to be a full on action film, or a police procedural. It doesn’t do both particularly well. There is a fantastically shot, shoot-out in Trafalgar Square that falls flat, due to the fact that there are approximately 11 by-standers, that’s right 11 by-standers in Trafalgar Square, the streets of central London have absolutely no traffic, which means we get cool shots of Winstone speeding along Waterloo bridge, but if you know anything about London, it instantly takes you out of the moment.
The villains are two-dimensional and get interrogated in a white office, with a great view of London, full with the latest Macbook’s and digital video cameras, but they never ask for lawyers.
If you’re a fan of the original series and you’re thinking of watching this, don’t. But, If you’re at a loose end one evening, stick this on and enjoy with the alcoholic beverage of your choice.

The Sweeney is out on DVD January 21st

Film review-This is 40

Judd Apatow has grown as a director. He started out doing funny-vulgar 20130102-090252.jpghumour, like “Knocked Up” and “The 40-Year-Old Virgin,” and producing similar comedies. Like with his last movie “funny people” Apatow has opted to not totally ignore the vulgar humour, but to intercut it with deeper subject matters, such as love, marriage, parenthood, responsibility and family, for the most part, it works.
“This is 40” is a spin-off to “knocked up” With Paul Rudd (Pete) Leslie Mann (Debbie) Maude Apatow (Sadie) and Iris Apatow (Charlotte) all reprising their roles. You may notice the absence of Katherine Heigel and Seth Rogen, this is due to Heigel very opening bashing Apatow during the press conferences for Knocked Up. Although Seth Rogen doesn’t appear, his character is mentioned.
Times are tough for the family, Sadie is going through puberty and is turning into a drama queen and they’re having huge financial difficulty. Pete’s record company is going bust and his deadbeat dad (Albert Brooks) is sponging money from him.

The first half of the movie plays out like a standard Apatow comedy, but then it goes a lot deeper and examines the characters relationships and problems. It becomes more and more interesting as the story unfolds. What’s unique about this film is, there is no obvious happy ending. The characters still annoy each other, there isn’t a quick-fix happy ever after ending, which really makes this movie stand heads and shoulders above the rest.

I enjoyed this movie and I loved catching up with these characters, but it was a little too long. Some scenes could have easily been cut, to make it run a bit smoother. With the same cast and creative team this would make an excellent HBO or Showtime series.

Episode 69: The Dark Knight trilogy

In which Martyn and Ash welcome the newest member to the Bad Wilf family, Chris. The trio are joined by Phil from who’s he?

They discuss Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy.

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Blu-Ray review: Woman in black

What makes Woman In Black so refreshing is that it is old-school psychological horror, complete with an isolated, haunted mansion, rocking chairs, beheaded dolls, random screams, mysterious deaths, untold secrets, dangerous silence, suspiciously-hostile locals, a hallucination sequence and horrifying consequences.
A few eyebrows were raised when Daniel Radcliffe was announced as the leading man; other than the Harry Potter franchise he had only done one drama called The December Boys. Let’s start by saying Radcliffe is amazing: his performance is captivating. A lot of the film focuses on his character alone in a haunted mansion and he manages to hold your attention throughout.
Radcliff plays Arthur Kipps, a down on his luck, London-based solicitor who is given a career-saving assignment by his firm. The young widower leaves his 4-year-old son in London and travels to a remote town to settle the affairs of the late Mrs. Alice Drablow. Arthur doesn’t receive a warm welcome from the villagers, whom clearly don’t want him there. He unlocks the huge mansion as well as a few horrifying secrets that lay buried on the land.
Apparently younger audiences haven’t taken to kindly to this and it’s easy to see why: The Woman in Black has a slow and steady build-up so those expecting to see something akin to Saw 27 will be bitterly disappointed.
The director, James Watkins, establishes the haunting mood of the story effortlessly. Some of the scenes can seem a little repetitive but the climax is all the better for it.
The Edwardian setting itself is unnerving enough so when you add in creepy sound effects, carefully crafted cinematography and Marco Beltrami’s eerie-yet-subtle background score to this ghost story you know you’re on a winning streak. The film’s dark and some-what gothic setting unnerves you even before the protagonist comes into the picture. If Daniel Radcliffe carries on like this it’ll soon be ‘Harry who?’
Special Features:

Director and writers commentary

Inside the Perfect Thriller: Making The Woman in Black

No Fear:

The Technical Gist

See also our review of the Woman in Black soundtrack.

Episode 65: The Avengers (Assemble)

In which Martyn, Imran and Ash take a look at The Avengers, or Avengers Assemble. Then Ash talks to two women about a puppet: Check out Ash’s excellent podcasts , Night’s at the round table. and Hammered Horror.

http://sohotheatre.com/whats-on/the-girl-with-the-iron-claws/

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