Review-Spectre 

In many ways Paramount are extremely lucky that Star Wars forced them to move Mission Impossible 5 from Boxing Day to a July release date, as MI:Rogue Nation and Spectre are pretty much the same movie. 

In Mission Impossible 5 Ethan Hunt has gone “rogue” and disappeared deep underground to track down and prove the existence of “the syndicate” as well as the man responsible for the death of his boss. Along the way, he is joined by his tech genius friend, Benji and a small fracture group whom are disobeying orders to help him. He also teams up with and saves a woman who has information regarding The Syndicate. All this happens whilst an outside force are trying to shut down the IMF agency.

In Spectre, James Bond has gone “rogue” and disappeared deep underground to track down and prove the existence of “Spectre” as well as the man responsible for the death of his boss. Along the way, he is joined by his tech genius friend, Q and a small fracture group whom are disobeying orders to help him. He also teams up with and saves a woman who has information regarding Spectre. All this happens whilst an outside force are trying to shut down the double-O programme.

So far, so similar and that’s Spectre’s biggest problem. It isn’t a terrible movie, in fact it’s actually quite enjoyable. It’s just very generic, it could be any summer blockbuster. 

The fight scenes and action pieces are stunning. The script is okay and the performances are strong, however it all just feels formulaic. It’s like someone making a lasagne from their nan’s recipe. It’s nice, but it’s just not quite right. Wait for Blu Ray. 

DVD review-The Lazarus Effect

A group of medical researchers develop a way of bringing animals back from the dead; when one of the researchers (Olivia Wilde) accidentally dies during a follow up experiment, her fiancé (Mark Duplass) uses their controversial process on her.

The film has an interesting premise, that could send a social message about the way we handle death and morality in the Western world. However, this movie is in hands of director David Gelb and writers Luke Dawson and Jeremy Slater. They fumble their way along, giving us a horror movie, full of paint-by-numbers clichés, with a story that doesn’t really make any sense.

There’s no character development and the plot gets stuck in a cul-de-sac.

The cast try their hardest, but even established actors like Wilde, Duplass and Amy Aquino struggle to elevate this mess.

The Lazarus Effect is out on DVD/Blu Ray and digital download on October 19th.

Review-Convenience 

Convenience tells the story of two life long friends A.Jay (Ray Panthaki) and Shaan (Adeel Akhtar), as they find themselves in deep with some Russian gangsters and a very limited time to settle the £8,000 debt that Shaan has racked up.
They decide the easiest way to get the money is to rob a near-by petrol garage. Unfortunately the safe has a time-lock and won’t open until 6am the following morning.


Their only option is to tie-up the manager and a customer in the back office, pose as employees and work a shift in the petrol garage.

If this ordeal wasn’t stressful enough, they soon learn there’s another employee in the stock room. Luckily for them, Levi (Vicky McClure) thinks they’re the two new trainees that have shown up a day early. They now face the challenge of keeping Levi out the office.

It’s lack of budget doesn’t show on screen. It’s beautifully shot and is held up by a great, yet simple premise. It also hosts some impressive cameos from Anthony Head (Buffy), Tony Way (Game of Thrones) and Verne Troyer (Austin Powers) they each play odd-ball characters that A.Jay and Shann encounter on their shift.
Overall, Convenience is a great example of low budget British comedies. The film manages to capture the tedium of retail work, yet is always watchable due to a great script and stellar performances from the cast.

Listen to our interviews from the press junket here